After urban regeneration

Communities, policy and place

Edited by Dave O'Brien and Peter Matthews

After urban regeneration
  • Published:

    11 Nov 2015
  • Page count:

    208 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447324157
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • Series:

    Connected Communities
  • £70.00 £56.00You save £14.00 (20%)
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After Urban Regeneration is a comprehensive study of contemporary trends in urban policy and planning. Leading scholars come together to create a key contribution to the literature on gentrification, with a focus on the history and theory of community in urban policy. Engaging with debates as to how urban policy has changed, and continues to change, following the financial crash of 2008, the book provides an essential antidote to those who claim that culture and society can replicate the role of the state. Based on research from the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Connected Communities programme and with a unique set of case studies drawing on artistic and cultural community work, the book will appeal to scholars and students in geography, urban studies, planning, sociology, law and art as well as policy makers and community workers.
Dr. Dave O'Brien is Senior Lecturer in Cultural Policy, at ICCE, Goldsmiths College, University of London. His most recent book is Cultural Policy, published by Routledge. He hosts the New Books In Critical Theory podcast.

Dr. Peter Matthews is Lecturer in Social Policy at SASS, University of Stirling. He publishes widely in urban studies, planning, social policy and housing.
Introduction ~ Peter Matthews and Dave O’Brien;
Section 1: After regeneration?;
Urban Policy and Communities ~ Stuart Wilks-Heeg;
Connecting community to the post-regeneration era ~ Peter Matthews and Dave O’Brien;
When things fall apart ~ Sue Cohen and Morag McDermont;
Section 2: Exploring Epistemologies;
Microsolutions for Megaproblems: What works in urban regeneration policy? ~ Max Nathan;
The work of art in the age of mechanical co-production. Steve Pool and Kate Pahl;
There is no local here, love ~ Rebecca Bernstein, Antonia Layard, Martin Maudsley and Hilary Ramsden;
Section 3: New places for communities;
Forging Communities: the CAER Heritage Project and the dynamics of co-production ~ Clyde Ancarno, Oliver Davis and David Wyatt;
Lessons from ‘The Vale’ – the role of hyperlocal media in shaping reputational geographies ~ David Harte;
Contemporary Governance Discourse and Digital Media: Convergences, Prospects & Problems for the ‘Big Society’ Agenda ~ Chris Speed, Amadu Wurie Khan, Sharon Baurley and Martin Phillips;
Section 4: new spaces for policy;
Localism, neighbourhood planning and community control: the MapLocal pilot ~ Phil Jones, Antonia Layard, Colin Lorne, Chris Speed;
Translation across borders: Exploring the use, relevance and impact of academic research in the policy process ~ Steve Connelly, Dave Vanderhoven, Catherine Durose, Liz Richardson and Peter Matthews;
Conclusion ~ Dave O’Brien and Peter Matthews.

"An accessible piece of literature that will add to the knowledge of many academics in this field." Town Planning Review

"A genuinely fresh, and admirably provocative, attempt to reshape the way we seek to understand the evolving urban policy agenda." Housing Studies

"After Urban Regeneration an excellent book and it is very well crafted and organised. The chapters are critical in tone and characterised by incisive critiques of community and urban policy and practice. There is nothing like this on the market that examines the impact of localism on communities, and the diverse ways in which community groups are cultivating new knowledges and practices of self government." Professor Rob Imrie, Goldsmiths, University of London

"This important contribution to the urban policy and regeneration literature is the first major text to critically examine urban policy in the UK since 2008, and proposes that we have entered a period of ‘post-regeneration’ in the UK. This contribution will be of use to academics, policy makers and communities alike." Andrew Tallon, University of the West of England

Product Format
Paperback
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
11 Nov 2015
Number of Pages
208
ISBN
978-1447324164
Product Format
Hardback
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
11 Nov 2015
Number of Pages
208
ISBN
978-1447324157
Product Format
EPUB
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
11 Nov 2015
Number of Pages
208
ISBN
978-1447324195
Product Format
Kindle
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
11 Nov 2015
Number of Pages
208
ISBN
978-1447324201

About the book

After Urban Regeneration is a comprehensive study of contemporary trends in urban policy and planning. Leading scholars come together to create a key contribution to the literature on gentrification, with a focus on the history and theory of community in urban policy. Engaging with debates as to how urban policy has changed, and continues to change, following the financial crash of 2008, the book provides an essential antidote to those who claim that culture and society can replicate the role of the state. Based on research from the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Connected Communities programme and with a unique set of case studies drawing on artistic and cultural community work, the book will appeal to scholars and students in geography, urban studies, planning, sociology, law and art as well as policy makers and community workers.

Content

Introduction ~ Peter Matthews and Dave O’Brien;
Section 1: After regeneration?;
Urban Policy and Communities ~ Stuart Wilks-Heeg;
Connecting community to the post-regeneration era ~ Peter Matthews and Dave O’Brien;
When things fall apart ~ Sue Cohen and Morag McDermont;
Section 2: Exploring Epistemologies;
Microsolutions for Megaproblems: What works in urban regeneration policy? ~ Max Nathan;
The work of art in the age of mechanical co-production. Steve Pool and Kate Pahl;
There is no local here, love ~ Rebecca Bernstein, Antonia Layard, Martin Maudsley and Hilary Ramsden;
Section 3: New places for communities;
Forging Communities: the CAER Heritage Project and the dynamics of co-production ~ Clyde Ancarno, Oliver Davis and David Wyatt;
Lessons from ‘The Vale’ – the role of hyperlocal media in shaping reputational geographies ~ David Harte;
Contemporary Governance Discourse and Digital Media: Convergences, Prospects & Problems for the ‘Big Society’ Agenda ~ Chris Speed, Amadu Wurie Khan, Sharon Baurley and Martin Phillips;
Section 4: new spaces for policy;
Localism, neighbourhood planning and community control: the MapLocal pilot ~ Phil Jones, Antonia Layard, Colin Lorne, Chris Speed;
Translation across borders: Exploring the use, relevance and impact of academic research in the policy process ~ Steve Connelly, Dave Vanderhoven, Catherine Durose, Liz Richardson and Peter Matthews;
Conclusion ~ Dave O’Brien and Peter Matthews.
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