Child protection

Managing conflict, hostility and aggression

By Siobhan E. Laird

Child protection
  • Published:

    06 Mar 2013
  • Page count:

    280 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1847429223
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • £21.99 £17.59You save £4.40 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    06 Mar 2013
  • Page count:

    280 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1847429230
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • £72.99 £58.39You save £14.60 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    06 Mar 2013
  • Page count:

    276 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447309871
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • £19.99 £16.00You save £3.99 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    06 Mar 2013
  • Page count:

    276 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447309888
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • £19.99 £16.00You save £3.99 (20%)
  • Buy from Amazon.co.uk
As they intervene in families to reduce the risk of harm to children, child protection social workers around the world are confronting increasingly high levels of hostility and aggression from some parents. Investigations into the deaths of children known to social services have accused social workers of failing to use their professional authority to challenge parents. This much needed book analyses public inquiries and serious case reviews to reveal the dynamics of hostility and aggression which contribute to the failure to protect children. These can occur within the office environment and between social workers and parents or their partners.. The book details applied theories of aggression in conjunction with the skills required for dealing with anger, conflict and aggression. A set of tools and reflective exercises assists the application of theory to day-to-day child protection practice. This indispensable and practical text is ideal for social work students, practitioners, trainers and academics specialising in child protection.
Dr Siobhan E. Laird qualified as a social worker in 1994. She is currently a lecturer at the Centre for Social Work based in the University of Nottingham. She has published extensively on child protection legislation and cultural competence in social work. Prior to taking up appointment at the University of Nottingham, Dr Laird was head of social work at the University of Ghana where she guided the indigenisation of social work degrees. 
Introduction; Theories of conflict and aggression; Managing conflict with colleagues; Conflict with management; Conflict between teams and agencies; Conflict with substitute carers; Managing conflict with mothers; Managing conflict with fathers; Managing conflict with children; Concluding remarks.
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"The book provides tools and methods to improve child protection/safeguarding practice, which will be of benefit to experienced practitioners and newly qualified social workers and ... a useful resource for social work educators." Joanne Westwood, University of Central Lancashire

About the book

As they intervene in families to reduce the risk of harm to children, child protection social workers around the world are confronting increasingly high levels of hostility and aggression from some parents. Investigations into the deaths of children known to social services have accused social workers of failing to use their professional authority to challenge parents. This much needed book analyses public inquiries and serious case reviews to reveal the dynamics of hostility and aggression which contribute to the failure to protect children. These can occur within the office environment and between social workers and parents or their partners.. The book details applied theories of aggression in conjunction with the skills required for dealing with anger, conflict and aggression. A set of tools and reflective exercises assists the application of theory to day-to-day child protection practice. This indispensable and practical text is ideal for social work students, practitioners, trainers and academics specialising in child protection.

Content

Introduction; Theories of conflict and aggression; Managing conflict with colleagues; Conflict with management; Conflict between teams and agencies; Conflict with substitute carers; Managing conflict with mothers; Managing conflict with fathers; Managing conflict with children; Concluding remarks.
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