Connecting Families?

Information & Communication Technologies, Generations, and the Life Course

Edited by Barbara Barbosa Neves and Cláudia Casimiro

Connecting Families?
  • Published:

    01 Jun 2018
  • Page count:

    266 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447339946
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%)
  • Pre-order
  • Published:

    01 Jun 2018
  • Page count:

    266 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447339960
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
  • Coming soon
  • Published:

    01 Jun 2018
  • Page count:

    266 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447339977
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
Are Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) connecting families? And what does this mean in terms of family routines, relationships, norms, work, intimacy and privacy?

This edited collection takes a lifecourse and generational perspective covering theory, including posthumanism and strong structuration theory, and methodology, including digital and cross-disciplinary methods. It presents a series of case studies on topics such as intergenerational connections, work-life balance, transnational families, digital storytelling and mobile parenting.

It will give students, researchers and practitioners a variety of tools to make sense of how ICTs are used, appropriated and domesticated in family life. These tools allow for an informed and critical understanding of ICTs and family dynamics.
Barbara Barbosa Neves is Lecturer/Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Melbourne and studies digital technologies and social inequalities. She is a board member of the Family Research Committee within the International Sociological Association.

Cláudia Casimiro is Assistant Professor of Sociology at ISCSP and full member researcher at CIEG, University of Lisbon and undertakes research on family violence, gender, digital technologies and online dating.
Part I: Introduction;
Foreword ~ Barry Wellman;
Connecting families? An introduction ~ Barbara Barbosa Neves and Cláudia Casimiro;

Part II: Theoretical and Methodological Approaches;
Theoretical perspectives on technology and society: Implications for understanding the relationship between ICTs and family life ~ Natasha Mauthner and Karolina Kazimerczak;
Recursive approaches to technology adoption, families, and the life course: actor-network theory and strong-structuration theory ~ Geoffrey Mead and Barbara Neves;
Coming of Old Age in the Digital Era: The Turn to Networked Individualism ~ Anabel Quan-Haase, Hua Wang, Barry Wellman, Renwen Zhang;
Oversharing in the time of selfies: an aesthetics of disappearance? ~ Amanda Du Preez;
The application of digital methods in a life course approach to family studies ~ Alexia Maddox;
Cross-disciplinary research methods to study technology use, family, and life course dynamics: lessons from an action research project on social isolation and loneliness in later life ~ Barbara Barbosa Neves, Ron Baecker, Diana Carvalho and Alexandra Sanders
From object to instrument. Technologies as tools for family relations and family research ~ Cláudia Casimiro and Magda Nico;

Part III: Empirical Approaches;
Use of Communication Technology to Maintain Intergenerational Contact: Toward an Understanding of ‘Digital Solidarity’ ~ Siyun Peng, Merril Silverstein, J. Jill Suitor, Megan Gilligan, Woosang Hwang, Sangbo Nam, and Brianna Routh;
Careful families and care as ‘kinwork’: An intergenerational study of families and digital media use in Melbourne ~ Jolynna Sinanan and Larissa Hjorth;
Floating Narratives: Transnational Families and Digital Storytelling ~ Catalina Arango Patiño;
Rescue Chains and Care Talk among Immigrants and their left-behind parents ~ Sondra Cuban;
“Wherever you go, wherever you are, I am with you… connected with my mobile” The use of mobile text messages for the maintenance of family and romantic relations ~ Bernadette Kneidinger-Müller;
Permeability of Work-family Borders: Effects of ICTs on Work-family Conflict in the childcare stage in Japan ~ Yuka Sakamoto;

Afterword: Research ethics - studying families and digital technology ~ Charles Ess;
Afterword: Conclusion and Future Directions: Families, ICTS, and Social Policy ~ Elizabeth Silva.

About the book

Are Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) connecting families? And what does this mean in terms of family routines, relationships, norms, work, intimacy and privacy?

This edited collection takes a lifecourse and generational perspective covering theory, including posthumanism and strong structuration theory, and methodology, including digital and cross-disciplinary methods. It presents a series of case studies on topics such as intergenerational connections, work-life balance, transnational families, digital storytelling and mobile parenting.

It will give students, researchers and practitioners a variety of tools to make sense of how ICTs are used, appropriated and domesticated in family life. These tools allow for an informed and critical understanding of ICTs and family dynamics.

Content

Part I: Introduction;
Foreword ~ Barry Wellman;
Connecting families? An introduction ~ Barbara Barbosa Neves and Cláudia Casimiro;

Part II: Theoretical and Methodological Approaches;
Theoretical perspectives on technology and society: Implications for understanding the relationship between ICTs and family life ~ Natasha Mauthner and Karolina Kazimerczak;
Recursive approaches to technology adoption, families, and the life course: actor-network theory and strong-structuration theory ~ Geoffrey Mead and Barbara Neves;
Coming of Old Age in the Digital Era: The Turn to Networked Individualism ~ Anabel Quan-Haase, Hua Wang, Barry Wellman, Renwen Zhang;
Oversharing in the time of selfies: an aesthetics of disappearance? ~ Amanda Du Preez;
The application of digital methods in a life course approach to family studies ~ Alexia Maddox;
Cross-disciplinary research methods to study technology use, family, and life course dynamics: lessons from an action research project on social isolation and loneliness in later life ~ Barbara Barbosa Neves, Ron Baecker, Diana Carvalho and Alexandra Sanders
From object to instrument. Technologies as tools for family relations and family research ~ Cláudia Casimiro and Magda Nico;

Part III: Empirical Approaches;
Use of Communication Technology to Maintain Intergenerational Contact: Toward an Understanding of ‘Digital Solidarity’ ~ Siyun Peng, Merril Silverstein, J. Jill Suitor, Megan Gilligan, Woosang Hwang, Sangbo Nam, and Brianna Routh;
Careful families and care as ‘kinwork’: An intergenerational study of families and digital media use in Melbourne ~ Jolynna Sinanan and Larissa Hjorth;
Floating Narratives: Transnational Families and Digital Storytelling ~ Catalina Arango Patiño;
Rescue Chains and Care Talk among Immigrants and their left-behind parents ~ Sondra Cuban;
“Wherever you go, wherever you are, I am with you… connected with my mobile” The use of mobile text messages for the maintenance of family and romantic relations ~ Bernadette Kneidinger-Müller;
Permeability of Work-family Borders: Effects of ICTs on Work-family Conflict in the childcare stage in Japan ~ Yuka Sakamoto;

Afterword: Research ethics - studying families and digital technology ~ Charles Ess;
Afterword: Conclusion and Future Directions: Families, ICTS, and Social Policy ~ Elizabeth Silva.
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