Danny Dorling

Danny Dorling is a Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. His recent books include The 32 Stops: Lives on London’s Central Line and (with Bethan Thomas) People and places: A 21st century atlas of the UK.
Showing 1-12 of 18 items.

Bankrupt Britain

An atlas of social change

A unique atlas giving a comprehensive picture of the effect of the recession on Britain. Essential reading for a broad audience with a national snap-shot of Britain during this time.

Fair play

A Daniel Dorling reader on social justice

Edited by Danny Dorling

Encompassing an extensive range of print and online media, this reader brings together a selection of highly influential writings by Danny Dorling which look at inequality and social justice.

The Grim Reaper's road map

An atlas of mortality in Britain

An atlas of mortality in Britain based on data from 1981 to 2004, this new study explores causes of death across the UK, including a description of the cause of death, a map and cartogram showing the spatial distribution of that cause, a commentary on the pattern observed and the reason for it.

Health inequalities

From Titanic to the crash

The third digital-only ebook taster of Unequal health: The scandal of our times by Danny Dorling. It gives a flavour of one of the major themes: health inequalities contains three chapters from the book, preceded by a specially-written all-new introduction.

The human atlas of Europe

A continent united in diversity

Written by leading international authors, this timely atlas explores Europe’s society, culture, economy, politics and environment using state of the art mapping techniques. It addresses fundamental questions around social cohesion and sustainable growth as Europe negotiates the UK’s exit while continuing through the economic crisis.

Identity in Britain

A cradle-to-grave atlas

Danny Dorling and Bethan Thomas have brought together this outstanding atlas to provide us with a unique visual picture of identity and geography combined. "Identity in Britain" explores our changing identities as we progress from infancy to old age and tells the story of the myriad geographies of life in Britain.

Inequalities in health

The evidence presented to the Independent Inquiry into Inequalities in Health, chaired by Sir Donald Acheson

This book presents all seventeen chapters of evidence commissioned by the Acheson Inquiry to inform its work. It complements both the Acheson Inquiry report published by The Stationary Office and The widening gap (The Policy Press, 1999), which provides a broad overview and systematic interpretation of the Inequalities in Health debate.

Injustice

Why social inequality still persists

We are living in the most remarkable and dangerous times. Globally, the richest 1% have never held a greater share of world wealth, while the share of most of the other 99% has collapsed in the last five years. In this fully rewritten and updated edition of Injustice, Dorling offers hope of a more equal society.

Life in Britain

Using Millennial Census data to understand poverty, inequality and place

This lively, colourful and innovative pack presents ten reports on key issues affecting life in Britain, showing key patterns and inequalities in education, housing, health, family and work as revealed by the 2001 Census, and accompanied by a summary sheet, posters and background information.

People and places

A 2001 Census atlas of the UK

People and places: A 2001 Census atlas of the UK provides an at-a-glance guide to social change in the UK at the start of the new millennium. It is the first comprehensive analysis of the 2001 Census and offers unique comparisons with the findings of the previous Census a decade ago.

People and places

?A 21st-century atlas of the UK

This unique atlas uses the 2011 Census data, alongside more recent data sources, to identify national and local trends and provide up-to-date analysis and discussion of the implications of current trends for future policy. This is the only social atlas of the 2011 Census that explains so much about how all of the UK is changing.

Poverty, inequality and health in Britain: 1800-2000

A reader

This reader provides two centuries of historical context to debates on health inequality. Extracts from classic texts, information about authors and an introduction draw together important themes of change and continuity. It is a key text for students on a range of policy courses and an excellent resource for anyone interested in poverty.