Miseducation

Inequality, education and the working classes

By Diane Reay

  • Published:

    11 Oct 2017
  • Page count:

    208 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447330653
  • Product Dimensions:

    138 x 216 mm
  • Series:

    21st Century Standpoints
  • £12.99 £10.39You save £2.60 (20%)
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  • Published:

    11 Oct 2017
  • Page count:

    208 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447330660
  • Product Dimensions:

    138 x 216 mm
  • Series:

    21st Century Standpoints
  • £9.99 £7.99You save £2.00 (20%)
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  • Published:

    11 Oct 2017
  • Page count:

    208 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447330677
  • Product Dimensions:

    138 x 216 mm
  • Series:

    21st Century Standpoints
  • £9.99 £7.99You save £2.00 (20%)
In this book Diane Reay, herself working class turned Cambridge professor, brings Brian Jackson and Dennis Marsden’s pioneering Education and the Working Class from 1962 up to date for the 21st century.

Drawing on over 500 interviews, the book includes rich, vivid stories from working class children and young people. It looks at class identity, the inadequate sticking plaster of social mobility, and the effects of wider economic and social class relationships on working class educational experiences.

The book addresses the urgent question of why the working classes are still faring so much worse than the upper and middle classes in education. It reveals how we have ended up with an educational system that still educates the different social classes in fundamentally different ways, and vitally – what we can do to achieve a fairer system.
Diane Reay grew up in a working class, coal mining community before becoming an inner city, primary school teacher for 20 years. She is now emeritus Professor of Education at the University of Cambridge and visiting Professor of Sociology at the LSE with particular interests in social justice issues in education, and cultural analyses of social class, race and gender. She has researched extensively in the areas of social class, gender and ethnicity across primary, secondary and post-compulsory stages of education.
Introduction;
Why can’t education compensate for society?;
The recent history of class in education;
Class in the classroom;
Social Mobility: a problematic solution;
The middle and upper classes: Getting the ‘best’ for your own child;
Class feeling: Troubling the soul and preying on the psyche;
Continuities and transformations: What has changed since Jackson and Marsden and what has remained the same?;
Conclusion: How and why do the working classes fare so much worse than the upper and middle classes in education? What can we do about it?;
Epilogue: Thinking through class.
Product Format
Paperback
Dimensions
138 x 216
Publication Date
11 Oct 2017
Number of Pages
208
ISBN
978-1447330653
Product Format
EPUB
Dimensions
138 x 216
Publication Date
11 Oct 2017
Number of Pages
208
ISBN
978-1447330660
Product Format
Kindle
Dimensions
138 x 216
Publication Date
11 Oct 2017
Number of Pages
208
ISBN
978-1447330677

About the book

In this book Diane Reay, herself working class turned Cambridge professor, brings Brian Jackson and Dennis Marsden’s pioneering Education and the Working Class from 1962 up to date for the 21st century.

Drawing on over 500 interviews, the book includes rich, vivid stories from working class children and young people. It looks at class identity, the inadequate sticking plaster of social mobility, and the effects of wider economic and social class relationships on working class educational experiences.

The book addresses the urgent question of why the working classes are still faring so much worse than the upper and middle classes in education. It reveals how we have ended up with an educational system that still educates the different social classes in fundamentally different ways, and vitally – what we can do to achieve a fairer system.

Content

Introduction;
Why can’t education compensate for society?;
The recent history of class in education;
Class in the classroom;
Social Mobility: a problematic solution;
The middle and upper classes: Getting the ‘best’ for your own child;
Class feeling: Troubling the soul and preying on the psyche;
Continuities and transformations: What has changed since Jackson and Marsden and what has remained the same?;
Conclusion: How and why do the working classes fare so much worse than the upper and middle classes in education? What can we do about it?;
Epilogue: Thinking through class.
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