Enabling participatory planning

Planning aid and advocacy in neo-liberal times

By Gavin Parker and Emma Street

Enabling participatory planning
  • Published:

    01 Feb 2018
  • Page count:

    92 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447341390
  • Product Dimensions:

    129 x 198 mm
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  • Published:

    01 Feb 2018
  • Page count:

    92 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447341413
  • Product Dimensions:

    129 x 198 mm
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  • Published:

    01 Feb 2018
  • Page count:

    92 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447341420
  • Product Dimensions:

    129 x 198 mm
  • £6.99 £5.59You save £1.40 (20%)
This book examines the challenges in delivering a participatory planning agenda in the face of an increasingly neo-liberalised planning system and charts the experience of Planning Aid England.
In an age of austerity, government spending cuts, privatisation and rising inequalities the need to support and include the most vulnerable in society is more acute than ever. However, forms of Advocacy Planning, the progressive concept championed for this purpose since the 1960s, is under threat from neo-liberalisation.
Rather than abandoning advocacy, the book asserts that only through sustained critical engagement will issues of exclusion be positively tackled and addressed. The authors propose neo-advocacy planning as the critical lens through which to effect positive change. This, they argue, will need to draw on a co-production model maintained through a well-resourced special purpose organisation set up to mobilise and resource planning intermediaries whose role it is to activate, support and educate those without the resources to secure such advocacy themselves.
Gavin Parker is Professor of Planning Studies at the University of Reading. Professor Parker maintains a strong interest in citizenship, participation and governance in land, planning and development. Recent research has centred on neighbourhood planning in England.

Emma Street is Associate Professor of Planning and Urban Governance at the University of Reading. Dr Street's research interests cut across urban governance, policy and politics, and planning, architecture and urban design.
Introduction - why this book and why now, structure/content;
Neo-liberal times and participation in planning;
Advocacy planning in review;
Planning Aid and Advocacy;
Neo-advocacy and contemporary issues in progressive planning;
Conclusion: the ways ahead.
Product Format
Hardback
Dimensions
129 x 198
Publication Date
1 Feb 2018
Number of Pages
92
ISBN
978-1447341390
Product Format
EPUB
Dimensions
129 x 198
Publication Date
1 Feb 2018
Number of Pages
92
ISBN
978-1447341413
Product Format
Kindle
Dimensions
129 x 198
Publication Date
1 Feb 2018
Number of Pages
92
ISBN
978-1447341420

About the book

This book examines the challenges in delivering a participatory planning agenda in the face of an increasingly neo-liberalised planning system and charts the experience of Planning Aid England.
In an age of austerity, government spending cuts, privatisation and rising inequalities the need to support and include the most vulnerable in society is more acute than ever. However, forms of Advocacy Planning, the progressive concept championed for this purpose since the 1960s, is under threat from neo-liberalisation.
Rather than abandoning advocacy, the book asserts that only through sustained critical engagement will issues of exclusion be positively tackled and addressed. The authors propose neo-advocacy planning as the critical lens through which to effect positive change. This, they argue, will need to draw on a co-production model maintained through a well-resourced special purpose organisation set up to mobilise and resource planning intermediaries whose role it is to activate, support and educate those without the resources to secure such advocacy themselves.

Content

Introduction - why this book and why now, structure/content;
Neo-liberal times and participation in planning;
Advocacy planning in review;
Planning Aid and Advocacy;
Neo-advocacy and contemporary issues in progressive planning;
Conclusion: the ways ahead.
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