Housing transitions through the life course

Aspirations, needs and policy

By Andrew Beer, Debbie Faulkner, with, Chris Paris and Terry Clower

Housing transitions through the life course
  • Published:

    22 Jun 2011
  • Page count:

    208 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1847424280
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • £77.99 £62.39You save £15.60 (20%)
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The housing we live in shapes individual access to jobs, health, well being and communities. There are also substantial differences between generations regarding the type of housing they aspire to live in, their attitudes to housing costs, the nature of their households and their attitudes to different tenures. This important contribution to the literature draws upon research from the UK, Australia and the USA to show how lifetime attitudes to housing have changed, with new population dynamics driving the market and a greater emphasis on consumption. It also considers how the global financial crisis has differentially affected housing markets across the globe, with variable impacts on the long term housing transitions of different populations.
Andrew Beer is a Professor in Geography at the University of Adelaide. His interests include the relationship between housing and the life course, regional economic development policies and homelessness.
Debbie Faulkner is a Research Fellow in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies at the University of Adelaide. She has published widely on issues of housing and ageing, demographic processes and immigration.
Housing markets and policy in the 21st century; Housing over the life course: housing histories, careers, pathways and transitions; Housing transitions and housing policy:international context and policy transfer; The housing transitions of younger adults; Housing transitions in mid life: consolidation, opportunity and risk; Housing transitions in later life; Housing transitions and disability: A 21st-century phenomenon; Housing transitions, economic restructuring and the marginalised; Conclusion: negotiating the housing market over the next decades.

"A major contribution to housing studies and to the wider welfare state literature" Journal of Social Policy

"The book furthermore illuminates a number of fundamental issues and trends, and lays bare a whole range of underlying causal mechanisms. As such, it has the potential to inspire a stream of future research." International Journal of Housing Policy

"A hugely impressive book. Housing transitions through the life course not only offers a valuable comparison of lifetime attitudes towards housing across different countries but also highlights how the global financial crisis has impacted on such markets. Bang up-to-date and highly readable. A much recommended read." Professor David Bailey, Coventry University Business School, UK

About the book

The housing we live in shapes individual access to jobs, health, well being and communities. There are also substantial differences between generations regarding the type of housing they aspire to live in, their attitudes to housing costs, the nature of their households and their attitudes to different tenures. This important contribution to the literature draws upon research from the UK, Australia and the USA to show how lifetime attitudes to housing have changed, with new population dynamics driving the market and a greater emphasis on consumption. It also considers how the global financial crisis has differentially affected housing markets across the globe, with variable impacts on the long term housing transitions of different populations.

Content

Housing markets and policy in the 21st century; Housing over the life course: housing histories, careers, pathways and transitions; Housing transitions and housing policy:international context and policy transfer; The housing transitions of younger adults; Housing transitions in mid life: consolidation, opportunity and risk; Housing transitions in later life; Housing transitions and disability: A 21st-century phenomenon; Housing transitions, economic restructuring and the marginalised; Conclusion: negotiating the housing market over the next decades.
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