Journal of Playwork Practice

  • Editors

    Shelly Newstead, Common Threads, UK

  • Jennifer Cartmel, Griffith University, Australia

  • Eric Worch, Bowling Green State University, USA

  • Frequency

    Two issues per annum: April and November

  • ISSN

    2053-1621 (print)

    2053-163X (online)

‘Playwork’ originated in the adventure playgrounds created in the middle of the twentieth century to provide children’s spaces within urban environments. Playwork practice is currently used by professionals working with children in an extensive range of international settings, from parks to prisons and deserts to development projects. The practice of playwork draws on a number of diverse disciplines for its theoretical and technical foundations, and playwork practice and its origins are studied by scholars from a wide range of fields.

Journal of Playwork Practice aims to advance playwork research and practice by providing the first ever interdisciplinary platform for the publication and dissemination of scholarship relevant to playwork practice. Journal of Playwork Practice bridges the playwork theory-practice divide by facilitating practitioner access to research relevant to their practice, and enables researchers interested in ‘playwork’ to access a hitherto inaccessible field of practice and its literature.

 

What people are saying about Journal of Playwork Practice

This journal provides a good platform for enriching the knowledge of playwork practitioners and is therefore an essential playwork resource." Aby Chau, Playright Children's Play Association

"A rigorous and serious accessible journal that will inform and provide research tools towards further development of practice and understanding within the playwork field." Jess Milne, winner of Lifetime in Play award

"An excellent, high quality resource that will support and inform the work that we do and contribute to informing the playwork practice of the practitioners that we work with." Rachel Maflin, Play Development Office, Gavo

"I welcome Journal of Playwork Practice as a playwork-led forum and anticipate the emergence of a lively, authoritative and distinctive addition to scholarly writing on childhood." Tim Gill, author of No Fear

The top 5 most read papers in October 2016 were:

Recently published papers include:

Shelly Newstead (Managing Editor), Common Threads, UK
Jennifer Cartmel (Associate Editor), Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia
Eric Worch (Associate Editor), Bowling Green State University, USA
 
Editorial Board
Professor David Ball, Professor of Risk Management and Director of the Centre for Decision Analysis and Risk Management, Middlesex University, England.
Dr John Barker, Lecturer/Social Work Representative on HSSC Ethics Committee – Social Work, Brunel University, England.
Marc Bekoff, Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Colorado, USA.
Dr Barbara Chancellor, Directorof the Outdoor Playspace Consultancy, Melbourne, Australia.
Dr Keith Cranwell, Chair Thurrock Play Network and Trustee London Play.
Mark Gladwin, trustee of Play England and Yorkshire Play, England.
Rebekah Jackson, Childcare Co-ordinator, Wrexham County Borough Council, Wales.
Eva Kane, PhD Student in Child and Youth Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Dr Pete King, Lecturer in Childhood Studies, Swansea University, Wales.
Chika Matsudaira University of Shizuoka Junior College, Japan
Dr Johan Meire, Researcher, Kind en Samenleving, Belgium.
Pauline O’Kane, Director Resource and Support, Network of Community Activities, Australia.
The Hon Dr Jocelynne Annette Scutt, Visiting Fellow, Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge University, England.
Dr Hannah Henry Smith, Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Coordinator, Office on Children and Youth, Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services, James Madison University, USA.
Professor Peter K Smith, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the Unit for School and Family Studies, Goldsmiths College, University of London, England.
Professor Dr John Wall, Professor and Chair Philosophy and Religion, Rutgers University, USA.
Philip Waters, Eden Project and European Centre for Environment and Human Health, England.
Rob Wheway, Director and Principal Consultant, Children’s Play Advisory Service, England.
Mike Wragg, Senior Lecturer in Playwork, Leeds Metropolitan University, England. 
 
‘Playwork’ originated in the adventure playgrounds created in the middle of the 20th century to provide children’s spaces within urban environments. Playwork practice is currently used by professionals working with children in an extensive range of international settings, from parks to prisons and deserts to development projects. The practice of playwork draws on a number of diverse disciplines for its theoretical and technical foundations, and playwork practice and its origins are studied by scholars from a wide range of fields. Journal of Playwork Practice aims to advance playwork research and practice by providing the first ever interdisciplinary platform for the publication and dissemination of relevant scholarship to playwork practice. Journal of Playwork Practice bridges the playwork theory-practice divide by facilitating practitioner access to relevant research to their practice, and enables researchers interested in ‘playwork’ to access a hitherto inaccessible field of practice and its literature.
 
Journal of Playwork Practice aims to advance the study and practice of playwork practice by providing an international platform for the publication and dissemination of relevant scholarship to playwork practice, from contemporary and historical perspectives and from all aspects of theory, philosophy and policy. It will encompass international and UK perspectives and will include a balance between peer-reviewed research papers and shorter, practitioner-focused contributions; historical and contemporary articles.
 
Journal of Playwork Practice welcomes empirical and conceptual studies on all aspects of playwork practice from contemporary and historical perspectives. We particularly welcome contributions in the following areas:
  • epistemological and methodological issues as applied to playwork research, theory and practice
  • empirical studies and conceptual analyses of theories relevant to playwork practice
  • the existence and nature of a children’s culture
  • play as currently conceptualised by the Playwork Principles (‘a process that is freely chosen, personally directed and intrinsically motivated’)
  • the nature and development of playwork practice in relation to the diverse range of settings in which it is used
  • the chronological development of playwork practice, from adventure playgrounds to play leadership schemes
  • comparative studies of playwork practice and alternative methodologies for working with children and young people
  • analysis and critiques of local, national and international policies and legislation in relation to playwork practice
  • evaluation of playwork practice employing quantative and qualitative methods
  • children’s experience of playwork practice
  • biographical essays on key figures in historical and contemporary playwork practice.
 
In line with our aim of encouraging practitioner research and facilitating dialogue between practitioners and researchers, Journal of Playwork Practice also welcome contributions from playwork practitioners, including:
  • reviews of classic and contemporary playwork literature
  • analysis and commentary on literature from all disciplines relevant to playwork practice 
  • reflective essays on theories as applied to playwork practice
  • reflective accounts on the implications of using playwork practice in diverse settings and cultures 
  • cross-national comparisons of using playwork practice and lessons learnt
  • examinations of specific areas of playwork practice which identify areas for further research
  • photo essays that illustrate specific aspects of playwork theory or practice.
 
Instructions for authors submitting papers for peer-review
  • It is assumed that submitted papers have not been published elsewhere and that they are not under consideration for publication by other journals. However, in line with our aim of enabling practitioners to access key research relevant to their work, the Editors are happy to consider revisions to, or updates on, previously published existing work. Please contact the Editors for further details.
  • Please use the term ‘playwork practitioner’ rather than ‘playworker’, in line with the conceptualisation of ‘playwork practice’ adopted by JPP as a form of practice which can be used by adults working with children in any setting regardless of job title.
  • Scholars from outside the playwork field are under no obligation to relate their material to contemporary playwork practice. In the first instance please email an abstract of no more than 150 words to jpp@commonthreads.org.uk so that the Editors can provide brief feedback on whether the proposed article falls within the remit of Journal of Playwork Practice.
  • Papers should normally be between 6,000 and 8,000 words in length (including references and abstract).
  • Please contact the Editors if the proposed paper falls outside this word limit.
  • Papers should be structured as follows; title, author's name, affiliation, abstract, keywords, main body of text, references and bibliography.
  • Please submit two versions of your paper. One should be completely anonymised, with all self references removed from the title page, text and bibliography. Please also anonymise Word documents in the 'Properties' section of the file details.
  • Please include in your covering email a paragraph about yourself: area in which you work, special projects, studies, research interests, background, etc. This paragraph should include an email address which will be published with your paper.
  • Authors should number all of the pages of the manuscript consecutively, beginning with the title page.
  • Please follow the additional guidelines as set out below.
  • Please send all articles to the Editors c/o jpp@commonthreads.org.uk. The Editors are happy to answer queries that arise throughout the submission process.
Peer-review policy - all papers are refereed by at least two reviewers, one of whom will be an expert in the subject area of the paper and one a playwork scholar.
 
 
Instructions for authors submitting practitioner articles
  • Please email a brief outline of your ideas to jpp@commonthreads.org.uk. The Editors will provide feedback on the appropriateness of the proposed article and supply further guidelines for articles which fall within the remit of JPP.
  • Please use the term ‘playwork practitioner’ rather than ‘playworker’, in line with the conceptualisation of ‘playwork practice’ adopted by JPP as a form of practice which can be used by adults working with children in any setting regardless of job title.
  • Submitted articles must be original work and must not be under consideration for publication in any other format. The author should state whether s/he is publishing related material elsewhere.
  • Articles should normally be around 2,000 words. Exact word limit to be agreed with the Editors for each article.
  • Please include a paragraph about yourself: area in which you work, background, etc. Include an email address that will be published with your article.
  • Authors should number all of the pages of the manuscript consecutively, beginning with the title page.
  • Please follow the additional guidelines as detailed below.
  • Please send all articles to the Editors c/o jpp@commonthreads.org.uk. The Editors are happy to answer queries that arise throughout the submission process or to provide further guidance if required.
Review policy - all practitioner articles are reviewed by the Editors and at least one playwork scholar when appropriate to ensure suitability for publication.
 
 
Style and formatting guidelines
  • British English spelling and punctuation is required.
  • Please observe the following conventions as far as possible when submitting text; font – Arial, Calibri, Courier, Times New Roman, Verdana, point size – 12 pt, no formatting.
  • Text should be supplied in .doc, .rtf, .odt or similar format.
  • Non-discriminatory language is mandatory. Further guidance may be found in Policy Press editorial guidelines (Appendix B: Sensitive language).
  • Explanatory notes should be kept to a minimum. If it is necessary to use them, they must be numbered consecutively in the text and listed at the end of the article. Please do not embed notes in the text.
  • Figures/diagrams/maps/tables: please do not embed in the text. Please supply in .eps, .wmf, Excel or Word format. Illustrations and photographs should be saved as one of the following formats: TIFF, EPS (encapsulated PostScript) or JPG at 300dpi.
 
References
A custom version of the Harvard system of referencing is used:
  • In-text citations: give the author’s surname followed by year of publication in brackets
  • List all references in full at the end of the article and remove any references not cited in the text
  • Book and journal titles should be in italics
  • Website details should be placed at the end of the reference. Do not include dates of access to websites
  • Spell out all acronyms in first instance
  • Only use page numbers for journal articles or edited books.
 
Example of book reference
Dorling, D, 2010, Injustice: Why social inequality persists, Bristol: Policy Press
 
Example of journal reference
Warin, P, 2012, Non-demand for social rights: A new challenge for social action in France, Journal of Poverty and Social Justice 20, 1, 41–53 
 
Example of chapter within edited / multi-authored publication 
Levitas, R, 2011, Utopia calling: Eradicating child poverty in the United Kingdom and beyond, in A. Minujin and S. Nandy (eds) Global child poverty and well-being: Measurement, concepts, policy and action, Bristol: Policy Press, 449–73
 
Example of website reference
House of Commons Debates, 2010, Work and pensions (CSR), Hansard, 4 November, col 337WH, 
www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201011/cmhansrd/cm101104/halltext/101104h0001.htm 
 
 
Editorial and copyright policy
  • The Editor has the right to determine whether articles are published either in part, whole or at all.
  • We do not offer payment to organisations or individuals which submit articles to Journal of Playwork Practice.
  • Articles are considered for publication on the understanding that on acceptance the entire copyright shall pass to the Policy Press as Publisher of Journal of Playwork Practice. All contributors must sign a copyright agreement before their articles can be published. For jointly authored articles the corresponding author may sign on behalf of co-authors provided that s/he has obtained their consent for copyright assignment. The copyright assignment agreement can be read here.
  • Contributors must take all steps to ensure that any photos or illustrations can be used for reproduction – that relevant permissions have been granted and that no prior copyright restrictions exist. The publishers can take no responsibility for ensuring that submitted illustrations/photos have permission granted and any complaints in this matter will be referred directly to the contributor.
  • Where copyright is not owned by the author(s), eg. where an article was written by an author in the course of his/her employment, the corresponding author is responsible for obtaining the consent of the copyright holder. Requests for permission to reproduce any part of articles published in the Journal of Playwork Practice should be addressed to Laura Vickers at Policy Press (Laura.Vickers@bristol.ac.uk). For information on what is permissible use for different versions of your article please see our policy on self archiving and institutional repositories.
  • Please also read our Journals Editorial Policies and Ethical Guidelines.
  • All published authors will receive a free copy of the issue in which their article appears, and are entitled to a free pdf offprint of their article on request (please contact pp-journals@bristol.ac.uk to request this).