Mapping environmental sustainability

Reflecting on systemic practices for participatory research

Edited by Sue Oreszczyn and Andy Lane

Mapping environmental sustainability
  • Published:

    06 Sep 2017
  • Page count:

    224 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447331575
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%)
  • Pre-order
  • Published:

    06 Sep 2017
  • Page count:

    224 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447335313
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
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  • Published:

    06 Sep 2017
  • Page count:

    224 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447335320
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
While there is growing interest in participatory research to address issues around environmental sustainability, the focus of analysis tends to be on the results or products of the research rather than the processes involved. Addressing this gap, the authors draw on their experience of specific mapping techniques, based on different systemic concepts and theories, that have helped facilitate, explore and capture different understandings of the relationships, perspectives and boundaries within situations involving environmental sustainability.

The development of visual mapping techniques are explained and practical case studies describe their application in environmental sustainability projects, from working with farmers and their networks to using visual mapping with indigenous communities and managing coastal environments. Each case study provides a ‘real world’ project example from researchers with extensive experience of using these techniques to research different aspects of environmental sustainability over several decades.
Dr Sue Oreszczyn is a Research Fellow at the Open University. She is also a Fellow of the RSA (Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce).

Andy Lane is Professor of Environmental Systems, The Open University. He is a member of the Chartered Institute for Ecology and Environmental Management, a Chartered Environmentalist and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.
Introduction ~ Sue Oreszczyn and Andy Lane;
Systems thinking in practice: Mapping complexity ~ Andy Lane and Martin Reynolds;
Researching agri-environmental problems with others ~ Sue Oreszczyn, Les Levidow and Dave Wield;
Mapping agri-environmental knowledge systems ~ Sue Oreszczyn and Andy Lane;
Using the visual with Indigenous communities ~ Andrea Berardi, Jay Mistry, Lakeram Haynes, Deirdre Jafferally, Elisa Bignante, Grace Albert, Rebecca Xavier, Ryan Benjamin, Géraud de Ville;
Mapping muck: stakeholders’ views on organic waste ~ Andy Lane, Rachel Slater and Sue Oreszczyn ;
Understanding and developing communities of practice through diagramming ~ Chris Blackmore, Natalie Foster, Kevin Collins, and Ray Ison;
‘Imagine’: Mapping sustainability indicators ~ Simon Bell;
Evaluating diagramming as praxis ~ Martin Reynolds;
Conclusion ~ Andy Lane and Sue Oreszczyn.

"An invaluable resource for all researchers interested in participatory methods for mapping environmental sustainability, covering both systemic concepts and practical realities". Dr Julie Ingram, Countryside & Community Research Institute, University of Gloucestershire

“Inspiring and pathbreaking, the importance of this book extends beyond the crucial role of visual methods in transdisciplinary research to address the deepest challenges of sustainability itself”? Professor Andrew Stirling, University of Sussex, UK.

About the book

While there is growing interest in participatory research to address issues around environmental sustainability, the focus of analysis tends to be on the results or products of the research rather than the processes involved. Addressing this gap, the authors draw on their experience of specific mapping techniques, based on different systemic concepts and theories, that have helped facilitate, explore and capture different understandings of the relationships, perspectives and boundaries within situations involving environmental sustainability.

The development of visual mapping techniques are explained and practical case studies describe their application in environmental sustainability projects, from working with farmers and their networks to using visual mapping with indigenous communities and managing coastal environments. Each case study provides a ‘real world’ project example from researchers with extensive experience of using these techniques to research different aspects of environmental sustainability over several decades.

Content

Introduction ~ Sue Oreszczyn and Andy Lane;
Systems thinking in practice: Mapping complexity ~ Andy Lane and Martin Reynolds;
Researching agri-environmental problems with others ~ Sue Oreszczyn, Les Levidow and Dave Wield;
Mapping agri-environmental knowledge systems ~ Sue Oreszczyn and Andy Lane;
Using the visual with Indigenous communities ~ Andrea Berardi, Jay Mistry, Lakeram Haynes, Deirdre Jafferally, Elisa Bignante, Grace Albert, Rebecca Xavier, Ryan Benjamin, Géraud de Ville;
Mapping muck: stakeholders’ views on organic waste ~ Andy Lane, Rachel Slater and Sue Oreszczyn ;
Understanding and developing communities of practice through diagramming ~ Chris Blackmore, Natalie Foster, Kevin Collins, and Ray Ison;
‘Imagine’: Mapping sustainability indicators ~ Simon Bell;
Evaluating diagramming as praxis ~ Martin Reynolds;
Conclusion ~ Andy Lane and Sue Oreszczyn.
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