Money for everyone

Why we need a citizen's income

By Malcolm Torry

Money for everyone
  • Published:

    27 Jun 2013
  • Page count:

    304 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447311256
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
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  • Published:

    27 Jun 2013
  • Page count:

    304 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447311249
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £77.99 £62.39You save £15.60 (20%)
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  • Published:

    27 Jun 2013
  • Page count:

    304 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447311270
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%)
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  • Published:

    27 Jun 2013
  • Page count:

    304 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447311782
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%)
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Due to government cuts, the benefits system is currently a hot topic. In this timely book, a Citizen’s Income (sometimes called a Basic Income) is defined as an unconditional, non-withdrawable income for every individual as a right of citizenship. This much-needed book, written by an experienced researcher and author, is the first for over a decade to analyse the social, economic and labour market advantages of a Citizen's Income in the UK. It demonstrates that it would be simple and cheap to administer, would reduce inequality, enhance individual freedom and would be good for the economy, social cohesion, families, and the employment market. It also contains international comparisons and links with broader issues around the meaning of poverty and inequality, making a valuable contribution to the debate around benefits.
Accessibly written, this is essential reading for policy-makers, researchers, teachers, students, and anyone interested in the future of our society and our economy
Dr. Malcolm Torry is Director of the Citizen’s Income Trust; he has first degrees in mathematics, theology, philosophy, and economics and management; and higher degrees in social policy and in theology. He has recently completed an honorary research fellowship in the Social Policy Department at the London School of Economics. He is Team Rector of the Church of England Parish of East Greenwich.
A note on terminology;
Imagine …;
How did we get to where we are now?;
Why do some reform proposals succeed, and some fail?;
How might we implement a Citizen’s Income?;
Has it ever happened?;
Criteria for a benefits system: coherence and administrative simplicity;
Criteria for a benefits system: the family, then, now, and in the future;
Criteria for a benefits system: incentives, efficiency, and dignity;
Criteria for a benefits system: the labour market, then, now, and in the future;
Would people work?;
Would a Citizen’s Income be an answer to poverty, inequality, and injustice?;
Who should receive a Citizen’s Income?;
Is a Citizen’s Income politically feasible?;
Can we afford a Citizen’s Income?;
Alternatives to a Citizen’s Income;
What can a Citizen’s Income not cope with?;
A brief summary;
Afterword.

"provides a wide ranging but general introduction for those who are new to the subject, while offering those with more familiarity a useful compendium of recent literatures and debates." Social Policy & Administration

"Malcolm Torry delivers a blockbuster argument in favour of a Citizen's Income to wholly or partially replace current benefits." customer review, Amazon

"The ideal of a Citizen’s Income is a challenging framework to reflect on. But ... all governments ... should seriously consider it, and Malcolm Torry certainly shows how to make it a reality." LSE Review of Books

"Citizen's Income is a big idea whose time might at last have come. Malcolm Torry's book could play a part in making that happen. Everyone should read it." Professor Hartley Dean, London School of Economics

“Comprehensive and persuasive, this book debunks the current orthodoxies on welfare reform, and sets out a radical alternative to coercion and 'targeting' - a universal, unconditional, non-withdrawable payment for every citizen.” Bill Jordan, Professor of Social Policy, Plymouth University

Product Format
Paperback
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
27 Jun 2013
Number of Pages
304
ISBN
978-1447311256
Product Format
Hardback
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
27 Jun 2013
Number of Pages
304
ISBN
978-1447311249
Product Format
EPUB
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
27 Jun 2013
Number of Pages
304
ISBN
978-1447311270
Product Format
Kindle
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
27 Jun 2013
Number of Pages
304
ISBN
978-1447311782

About the book

Due to government cuts, the benefits system is currently a hot topic. In this timely book, a Citizen’s Income (sometimes called a Basic Income) is defined as an unconditional, non-withdrawable income for every individual as a right of citizenship. This much-needed book, written by an experienced researcher and author, is the first for over a decade to analyse the social, economic and labour market advantages of a Citizen's Income in the UK. It demonstrates that it would be simple and cheap to administer, would reduce inequality, enhance individual freedom and would be good for the economy, social cohesion, families, and the employment market. It also contains international comparisons and links with broader issues around the meaning of poverty and inequality, making a valuable contribution to the debate around benefits.
Accessibly written, this is essential reading for policy-makers, researchers, teachers, students, and anyone interested in the future of our society and our economy

Content

A note on terminology;
Imagine …;
How did we get to where we are now?;
Why do some reform proposals succeed, and some fail?;
How might we implement a Citizen’s Income?;
Has it ever happened?;
Criteria for a benefits system: coherence and administrative simplicity;
Criteria for a benefits system: the family, then, now, and in the future;
Criteria for a benefits system: incentives, efficiency, and dignity;
Criteria for a benefits system: the labour market, then, now, and in the future;
Would people work?;
Would a Citizen’s Income be an answer to poverty, inequality, and injustice?;
Who should receive a Citizen’s Income?;
Is a Citizen’s Income politically feasible?;
Can we afford a Citizen’s Income?;
Alternatives to a Citizen’s Income;
What can a Citizen’s Income not cope with?;
A brief summary;
Afterword.
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