Parenting the crisis

The cultural politics of parent-blame

By Tracey Jensen

Parenting the crisis
  • Published:

    28 Mar 2018
  • Page count:

    216 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447325062
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    28 Mar 2018
  • Page count:

    216 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447325055
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £70.00 £56.00You save £14.00 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    28 Mar 2018
  • Page count:

    216 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447325086
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    28 Mar 2018
  • Page count:

    216 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447325093
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%)
Bad parenting is so often blamed for Britain’s ‘broken society’, manifesting in sites as diverse as the government reaction to the riots of 2011, popular ‘entertainment’ like Supernanny and the discussion boards of Mumsnet.

This book examines how these pathologising ideas of failing, chaotic and dysfunctional families are manufactured across media, policy and public debate and how they create a powerful consensus that Britain is in the grip of a ‘parent crisis’.

It tracks how crisis talk around parenting has been used to police and discipline families who are considered to be morally deficient and socially irresponsible. Most damagingly, it has been used to justify increasingly punitive state policies towards families in the name of making ‘bad parents’ more responsible.

Is the real crisis in our perceptions rather than reality? This is essential reading for anyone engaged in policy and popular debate around parenting.
Tracey Jensen is Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies at the University of Lancaster, UK. Her research interests are concerned with: the reproduction of inequalities and divisions through and across identity categories; policy and popular debates of social mobility and immobility; and parenting culture as it travels across different media and cultural sites and manifests in policy.
‘Where Are The Parents?’
Mothercraft to Mumsnet
The Cultural Industry of Parent Blame
The Supernanny State
Ideal Families and Impossibility
Weaponising Parent Crisis in Postwelfare Britain
Conclusion – Re-imagining Crisis

"A timely, energetic, and engaging critique of the presumptions behind parent-blaming in culture and policy-making." Dr Jennie Bristow, Canterbury Christ Church University

About the book

Bad parenting is so often blamed for Britain’s ‘broken society’, manifesting in sites as diverse as the government reaction to the riots of 2011, popular ‘entertainment’ like Supernanny and the discussion boards of Mumsnet.

This book examines how these pathologising ideas of failing, chaotic and dysfunctional families are manufactured across media, policy and public debate and how they create a powerful consensus that Britain is in the grip of a ‘parent crisis’.

It tracks how crisis talk around parenting has been used to police and discipline families who are considered to be morally deficient and socially irresponsible. Most damagingly, it has been used to justify increasingly punitive state policies towards families in the name of making ‘bad parents’ more responsible.

Is the real crisis in our perceptions rather than reality? This is essential reading for anyone engaged in policy and popular debate around parenting.

Content

‘Where Are The Parents?’
Mothercraft to Mumsnet
The Cultural Industry of Parent Blame
The Supernanny State
Ideal Families and Impossibility
Weaponising Parent Crisis in Postwelfare Britain
Conclusion – Re-imagining Crisis
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