Professional health regulation in the public interest

International perspectives

Edited by John Martyn Chamberlain, Mike Dent and Mike Saks

  • Published:

    06 Jun 2018
  • Page count:

    224 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447335337
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • Series:

    Sociology of health professions
  • £26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
  • Coming soon
  • Published:

    06 Jun 2018
  • Page count:

    224 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447335344
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • Series:

    Sociology of health professions
  • £26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
There are significant variations in how healthcare systems and health professionals are regulated globally. One feature that they increasingly have in common is an emphasis on the value of including members of the public in quality assurance processes. While many argue that this will help better serve the public interest, others question how far the changing regulatory reform agenda is still dominated by medical interests.

Bringing together leading academics worldwide, this collection compares and critically examines the ways in which different countries are regulating healthcare in general, and health professions in particular, in the interest of users and the wider public. It is the first book in the Sociology of Health Professions series.
Dr Martyn Chamberlain is a medical criminologist whose interdisciplinary academic background covers criminology, bioethics, socio-legal studies and medical sociology. His research interests include the study of medical malpractice, negligence and criminality; the role of ‘big data’ and artificial intelligence in public health ethics and governance; as well as the emergence of gene editing technology and the role of neuroscience in the courtroom.

Mike Dent is Emeritus Professor, Staffordshire University & Visiting Professor, University of Leicester. He is a sociologist with an interest in healthcare professions and comparative healthcare organisation. Currently, he is also researching and publishing on the topic of public and user involvement in healthcare. Mike is also on the board of RC52 Sociology of Professions of International Sociological Association (ISA).

Professor Mike Saks is Emeritus Professor at the University of Suffolk and Visiting Professor at the University of Lincoln, Plymouth Marjon University, the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, and the University of Toronto, Canada. Alongside his previous membership of the Executive/Board of six Universities (including as Chief Executive), he has produced numerous high-profile journal articles/chapters, as well as fifteen books on health, professions, regulation and research methods.
Foreword ~ Richard B. Saltman;
Editors’ Overview ~ John Martyn Chamberlain, Mike Dent and Mike Saks;
Introduction: Professional health regulation in the public interest ~ John Martyn Chamberlain;
Health care governance, user involvement and medical regulation in Europe ~ Mike Dent;
The informalisation of professional-patient interactions and the consequences for regulation in the United Kingdom ~ Patrick Brown and Ruben Flores
The regulation of health care in Scandinavia: Professionals, public interest and trust ~ Karsten Vrangbæk;
Medical regulation for the public interest in the United Kingdom ~ William Roche;
Regulating the regulators: The rise of the United Kingdom Professional Standards Authority ~ Judith Allsop and Kathryn Jones;
Regulation and Russian medicine: Whither medical professionalisation? ~ Mike Saks;
Patterns of medical oversight and regulation in Canada ~ Humayun Ahmed, Adalsteinn Brown and Mike Saks;
Let the consumer beware: Maintenance of licensure and certification in the United States ~ Ruth Horowitz;
Governing complementary and alternative medicine in Brazil and Portugal: Implications for CAM professionals and the public ~ Joana Almeida, Nelson Barros and Pamela Siegel;
Birth of the hydra-headed monster in Australia: A unique antipodean model of health workforce governance ~ Stephanie Short and Fiona Pacey;
Health complaints entities in Australia and New Zealand: Serving the public interest? ~ Jennifer Morris, Jennifer Moore and Marie Bismark;
Trust and regulation of health systems: Insights from India ~ Michael Calnan and Sumit Kane.

About the book

There are significant variations in how healthcare systems and health professionals are regulated globally. One feature that they increasingly have in common is an emphasis on the value of including members of the public in quality assurance processes. While many argue that this will help better serve the public interest, others question how far the changing regulatory reform agenda is still dominated by medical interests.

Bringing together leading academics worldwide, this collection compares and critically examines the ways in which different countries are regulating healthcare in general, and health professions in particular, in the interest of users and the wider public. It is the first book in the Sociology of Health Professions series.

Content

Foreword ~ Richard B. Saltman;
Editors’ Overview ~ John Martyn Chamberlain, Mike Dent and Mike Saks;
Introduction: Professional health regulation in the public interest ~ John Martyn Chamberlain;
Health care governance, user involvement and medical regulation in Europe ~ Mike Dent;
The informalisation of professional-patient interactions and the consequences for regulation in the United Kingdom ~ Patrick Brown and Ruben Flores
The regulation of health care in Scandinavia: Professionals, public interest and trust ~ Karsten Vrangbæk;
Medical regulation for the public interest in the United Kingdom ~ William Roche;
Regulating the regulators: The rise of the United Kingdom Professional Standards Authority ~ Judith Allsop and Kathryn Jones;
Regulation and Russian medicine: Whither medical professionalisation? ~ Mike Saks;
Patterns of medical oversight and regulation in Canada ~ Humayun Ahmed, Adalsteinn Brown and Mike Saks;
Let the consumer beware: Maintenance of licensure and certification in the United States ~ Ruth Horowitz;
Governing complementary and alternative medicine in Brazil and Portugal: Implications for CAM professionals and the public ~ Joana Almeida, Nelson Barros and Pamela Siegel;
Birth of the hydra-headed monster in Australia: A unique antipodean model of health workforce governance ~ Stephanie Short and Fiona Pacey;
Health complaints entities in Australia and New Zealand: Serving the public interest? ~ Jennifer Morris, Jennifer Moore and Marie Bismark;
Trust and regulation of health systems: Insights from India ~ Michael Calnan and Sumit Kane.
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