Radical solutions to the housing supply crisis

By Duncan Bowie

Radical solutions to the housing supply crisis
  • Published:

    25 Jan 2017
  • Page count:

    192 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447328490
  • Product Dimensions:

    129 x 198 mm
  • £9.99 £4.99You save £5.00 (50%)
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  • Published:

    25 Jan 2017
  • Page count:

    192 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447336686
  • Product Dimensions:

    129 x 198 mm
  • £7.99 £6.40You save £1.59 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    25 Jan 2017
  • Page count:

    192 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447336679
  • Product Dimensions:

    129 x 198 mm
  • £7.99 £6.40You save £1.59 (20%)
  • Buy from Amazon.co.uk
As housing supply in England reaches crisis point, Duncan Bowie provides a critical review of housing policy under successive UK governments. From Blair’s New Labour and Cameron’s Coalition government to the 2016 Housing and Planning Act, Bowie demonstrates how successive governments have failed to provide adequate, affordable housing, leading to a chronic lack of provision.
Exploring the inter-relationship between housing, planning and land policies, Bowie puts forward a reform programme based on an alternative set of policy priorities and delivery mechanisms, arguing the case for an integrated approach on land, taxation, planning and public investment to provide radical solutions to a growing crisis.
Duncan Bowie is senior lecturer in spatial planning and housing at the University of Westminster and course leader on the postgraduate planning course. He has worked in senior positions for the Mayor of London, the Housing Corporation, the Association of London Government, the London Docklands Development Corporation and the London Boroughs of Newham and Lambeth. He convenes the Highbury Group on Housing Delivery, an academic/practitioner research and policy development network, is a member of the policy council of the TCPA and of the London Labour Housing Group committee. He is the author of Politics, Planning and Homes in a World City (2010) and The Radical and Socialist Tradition in British Planning (2016).
Section 1: The context;
Conservative government policy and the Housing and Planning Act 2016;
Critiques of the current direction of government policy;
The failure of governments since 1979 and the ideological continuities;
Section 2: The crisis of housing supply;
The housing deficit;
Affordable by whom?;
The wrong kind of homes;
The ineffecient use of the existing stock;
The failure of the English planning system;
Section 3: There is an alternative;
A radical programme for reform;
Conclusion: The four key issues.

"This timely and accessible book offers an alternative to existing accounts and an authoritative perspective that will stimulate academic and policy debate over how to address the continuing failure of housing supply and housing policy in England." Alan Murie, Emeritus Professor of Urban and Regional Studies, University of Birmingham

About the book

As housing supply in England reaches crisis point, Duncan Bowie provides a critical review of housing policy under successive UK governments. From Blair’s New Labour and Cameron’s Coalition government to the 2016 Housing and Planning Act, Bowie demonstrates how successive governments have failed to provide adequate, affordable housing, leading to a chronic lack of provision.
Exploring the inter-relationship between housing, planning and land policies, Bowie puts forward a reform programme based on an alternative set of policy priorities and delivery mechanisms, arguing the case for an integrated approach on land, taxation, planning and public investment to provide radical solutions to a growing crisis.

Content

Section 1: The context;
Conservative government policy and the Housing and Planning Act 2016;
Critiques of the current direction of government policy;
The failure of governments since 1979 and the ideological continuities;
Section 2: The crisis of housing supply;
The housing deficit;
Affordable by whom?;
The wrong kind of homes;
The ineffecient use of the existing stock;
The failure of the English planning system;
Section 3: There is an alternative;
A radical programme for reform;
Conclusion: The four key issues.
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