Re-imagining contested communities

Connecting Rotherham through research

Edited by Kate Pahl, Elizabeth Pente, Zanib Rasool and Elizabeth Campbell

  • Published:

    21 Mar 2018
  • Page count:

    192 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447333326
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £29.99 £23.99You save £6.00 (20%)
  • Pre-order
  • Published:

    21 Mar 2018
  • Page count:

    192 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447333302
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%)
  • Pre-order
  • Published:

    21 Mar 2018
  • Page count:

    192 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447333333
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £29.99 £23.99You save £6.00 (20%)
  • Coming soon
  • Published:

    21 Mar 2018
  • Page count:

    192 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447333340
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £29.99 £23.99You save £6.00 (20%)
This is a book that challenges contemporary images of ‘place’. Too often we are told about ‘deprived neighbourhoods’ but rarely do the people who live in those communities get to shape the agenda and describe, from their perspective, what is important to them. In this unique book the process of re-imagining comes to the fore in a fresh and contemporary look at one UK town, Rotherham.
Using history, artistic practice, writing, poetry, autobiography and collaborative ethnography, this book literally and figuratively re-imagines a place. It is a manifesto for alternative visions of community, located in histories and cultural reference points that often remain unheard within the mainstream media. As such, the book presents a ‘how to’ for researchers interested in community collaborative research and accessing alternative ways of knowing and voices in marginalised communities.
Introduction ~ Kate Pahl, Miles Crompton;
Emotions in community research ~ Zanib Rasool;
Collaborative Ethnography in Context ~ Luke Eric Lassiter, Beth Campbell, Kate Pahl;
What parents know ~ Abi Hackett and parents from Coleridge school;
Artistic approaches to community research ~ Steve Pool and team;
Rotherham retrospective ~ Paul Ward and Liz Pente;
Histories and cultures ~ Mariam Shah, William Gould;
Silk and Steel ~ Khalida Luqman, Cassie Limb;
Being a British Muslim ~ Zahir Rafiq;
Identity ~ Zanib Rasool, Khalida Luqman, Mariam Shah, Shaheen Shah;
Racism ~ Zanib Rasool;
Futures, hope, literacies ~ Deborah Bullivant;
Safe spaces and community activism ~ Zanib Rasool;
Hope – the Roma boys project ~ Marcus Hurcombe;
Hope – the girls poetry group ~ Zanib Rasool, Helen Mort – Girls poetry group;
Concluding thoughts ~ Kate Pahl and the team.

About the book

This is a book that challenges contemporary images of ‘place’. Too often we are told about ‘deprived neighbourhoods’ but rarely do the people who live in those communities get to shape the agenda and describe, from their perspective, what is important to them. In this unique book the process of re-imagining comes to the fore in a fresh and contemporary look at one UK town, Rotherham.
Using history, artistic practice, writing, poetry, autobiography and collaborative ethnography, this book literally and figuratively re-imagines a place. It is a manifesto for alternative visions of community, located in histories and cultural reference points that often remain unheard within the mainstream media. As such, the book presents a ‘how to’ for researchers interested in community collaborative research and accessing alternative ways of knowing and voices in marginalised communities.

Content

Introduction ~ Kate Pahl, Miles Crompton;
Emotions in community research ~ Zanib Rasool;
Collaborative Ethnography in Context ~ Luke Eric Lassiter, Beth Campbell, Kate Pahl;
What parents know ~ Abi Hackett and parents from Coleridge school;
Artistic approaches to community research ~ Steve Pool and team;
Rotherham retrospective ~ Paul Ward and Liz Pente;
Histories and cultures ~ Mariam Shah, William Gould;
Silk and Steel ~ Khalida Luqman, Cassie Limb;
Being a British Muslim ~ Zahir Rafiq;
Identity ~ Zanib Rasool, Khalida Luqman, Mariam Shah, Shaheen Shah;
Racism ~ Zanib Rasool;
Futures, hope, literacies ~ Deborah Bullivant;
Safe spaces and community activism ~ Zanib Rasool;
Hope – the Roma boys project ~ Marcus Hurcombe;
Hope – the girls poetry group ~ Zanib Rasool, Helen Mort – Girls poetry group;
Concluding thoughts ~ Kate Pahl and the team.
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