Research and policy in ethnic relations

Compromised dynamics in a neoliberal era

Edited by Charles Husband

Research and policy in ethnic relations
In the field of ethnic relations the complex, often tortuous, interactions among academic researchers, research funders and those who use the research often result in social policy interventions that are poorly conceived and flawed in their implementation.
In this unique book, the contributors seek to develop a dialogue about the multiple constraints that skew research and its findings, and to kick-start a wider debate about the political context of current research and policy. In doing so, they aim to produce a renewed awareness of the current links between research and social policy in ethnic relations and to provide a critically reflexive basis for shaping interventions.
It will be of interest to academics working in higher and further education as well as to students at higher undergraduate and postgraduate level, and to a wide range of people working in ethnic relations policy fora.
Charles Husband is an interdisciplinary social scientist with a commitment to policy-relevant research in the area of ethnic relations. He is Professor Emeritus in Social Analysis at the University of Bradford (UK), Docent in Sociology at the University of Helsinki (Finland), and Visiting Professor at the Sami University College (Norway).
Introduction ~ Charles Husband;
Constraint and compromise: university researchers, their relation to funders and to policymaking for a multiethnic Britain ~ Charles Husband;
‘Hating to know’: government and social policy research in multicultural Australia ~ Andrew Jakubowicz;
In-group identity and the challenges of ethnographic research ~ Yunis Alam;
Anthros and pimps doing the God trick: researching Muslim young people ~ M.G. Khan;
Reflections of a research funder ~ Emma Stone;
The European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights: linking research, policy and practice ~ Ioannis N. Dimitrakopoulos;
The value of research for local authorities: a practitioner perspective ~ Stan Kidd and Tony Reeves

“This engrossing and timely collection of critical perspectives explores the impact of the commodification of knowledge on contemporary ethnic relations, suggesting an urgent need for establishing a more effective dialogue between policymakers and social scientists.” Professor Michael Meadows, Griffith Centre for Cultural Research, Brisbane, Australia

“A lucid collection at the cutting edge of critical engagement with how academic research may be used or ignored, this book stands out as a novel and distinct contribution to our understanding and will be of vital use to researchers and practitioners alike." Dr Nasar Meer, Reader in Comparative Social Policy and Citizenship, Strathclyde University

“A richly rewarding collection that challenges both academics and policymakers to think differently about how we can develop better policy agendas in this complex field” Professor John Solomos, Department of Sociology, University of Warwick

“Combining reflective and detailed case studies and thoughtful theoretical accounts, this collection provides a well-judged and challenging intervention in how academic research and policymaking in the field of 'ethnic relations' intersect.” Dr Gavan Titley, National University of Ireland Maynooth

Product Format
Paperback
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
22 Jun 2016
Number of Pages
176
ISBN
978-1447314905
Product Format
Hardback
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
27 Mar 2015
Number of Pages
176
ISBN
978-1447314899
Product Format
EPUB
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
22 Jun 2016
Number of Pages
176
ISBN
978-1447320838
Product Format
Kindle
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
22 Jun 2016
Number of Pages
176
ISBN
978-1447320845

About the book

In the field of ethnic relations the complex, often tortuous, interactions among academic researchers, research funders and those who use the research often result in social policy interventions that are poorly conceived and flawed in their implementation.
In this unique book, the contributors seek to develop a dialogue about the multiple constraints that skew research and its findings, and to kick-start a wider debate about the political context of current research and policy. In doing so, they aim to produce a renewed awareness of the current links between research and social policy in ethnic relations and to provide a critically reflexive basis for shaping interventions.
It will be of interest to academics working in higher and further education as well as to students at higher undergraduate and postgraduate level, and to a wide range of people working in ethnic relations policy fora.

Content

Introduction ~ Charles Husband;
Constraint and compromise: university researchers, their relation to funders and to policymaking for a multiethnic Britain ~ Charles Husband;
‘Hating to know’: government and social policy research in multicultural Australia ~ Andrew Jakubowicz;
In-group identity and the challenges of ethnographic research ~ Yunis Alam;
Anthros and pimps doing the God trick: researching Muslim young people ~ M.G. Khan;
Reflections of a research funder ~ Emma Stone;
The European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights: linking research, policy and practice ~ Ioannis N. Dimitrakopoulos;
The value of research for local authorities: a practitioner perspective ~ Stan Kidd and Tony Reeves
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