The rise of the Right

English nationalism and the transformation of working-class politics

By Simon Winlow, Steve Hall and James Treadwell

The rise of the Right
  • Published:

    18 Jan 2017
  • Page count:

    216 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447328483
  • Product Dimensions:

    138 x 216 mm
  • £12.99 £10.39You save £2.60 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    17 Nov 2016
  • Page count:

    216 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447328513
  • Product Dimensions:

    138 x 216 mm
  • £12.99 £10.39You save £2.60 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    17 Nov 2016
  • Page count:

    216 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447328520
  • Product Dimensions:

    138 x 216 mm
  • £12.99 £10.39You save £2.60 (20%)
  • Buy from Amazon.co.uk
The shock Brexit result highlighted a worrying trend: underemployed white men and women who have seen their standard of living fall, their communities disintegrate and their sense of value, function and inclusion diminish, desperately want a mainstream political party to defend their interests. However, no such party exists. These men and women cannot connect their declining fortunes and growing frustrations to their true cause. Instead, immigrants are scapegoated and groups like the English Defence League (EDL) emerge.

This book is the first to offer an accessible and uncompromising look at the EDL. It aims to alter thinking about working-class politics and the rise of right-wing nationalism in the de-industrialised and decaying towns and cities of England. The rise of the right among the working class, the authors claim, is inextricably connected to the withdrawal of the political left from traditional working-class communities, and the left’s refusal to advance the economic interests of those who have suffered most from neoliberal economic restructuring. Incisive, contentious and boundary-breaking, it uses the voices of men and women who now support far-right political groups to address the total failure of mainstream parliamentary politics and the rising tide of frustration, resentment and anger.
Simon Winlow is Professor of Criminology in the Teesside Centre for Realist Criminology, Teesside University. A critical criminologist with research expertise in both sociology and criminology, he has also published widely on violence, criminal markets and cultures, and social, political and economic change.


Steve Hall is Professor of Criminology in the Teesside Centre for Realist Criminology, Teesside University. An internationally leading criminological researcher and theorist, he has published widely on criminological theory, consumerism and the history of violence.


James Treadwell is Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Birmingham City University. He is renowned for his ethnographic work, and he has published widely on criminal markets, professional and organised crime, violence and victimisation.
Introduction;
Dead Politics;
The Fickle Parent;
Redundant;
The Hated Centre;
The Scapegoat;
Mourning and Melancholia in the EDL;
Conclusion: Begin from the Beginning;
Postscript - Brexit.

"An honest book that critiques, questions, and debates the relationship between an unfair neo-liberal society, working-class people and the rise of the right". Lisa Mckenzie, London School of Economics & Political Science

"The achievement of this book that it is prepared to make a case for such a vision from within the horizons of one of the most cramped, defensive, melancholic and self-destructive corners of the working class landscape." - Universal Siblinghood

"If the Western left don't pay heed to what Winlow et al have to say, then it could be curtains forever." Sputnik News

"[This book] should be an obligatory reading for anyone attempting to understand the increasing anti-establishment resentment against the self-serving elites across the West." Journal of Extreme Anthropology

"Compelling reading...a provocative, invigorating and critical analysis of contemporary political landscapes where simplistic left/right distinctions no longer apply." Elaine Campbell, Newcastle University

'In their brilliantly-researched work, the authors show what a disaster the ‘mainstream’ left’s embrace of liberalism has been for traditional working-class communities’ Neil Clark, journalist.

"An unapologetically bleak account of contemporary Britain, cutting angrily and incisively through the thickets of liberal dogma. Essential reading." Mark Carrigan, Digital Fellow, The Sociological Review

"This brilliant book shows why the downfall of the left is a post-GFC and post-Brexit condition which, without action, could become permanent." Steve Redhead, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia

"A fast(er) moving novel take on how New Labour and the liberal left media created the circumstances in which the English Defense League would grow and of how UKIP and the EDL are linked.” Danny Dorling, University of Oxford

Product Format
Paperback
Dimensions
138 x 216
Publication Date
18 Jan 2017
Number of Pages
216
ISBN
978-1447328483
Product Format
EPUB
Dimensions
138 x 216
Publication Date
17 Nov 2016
Number of Pages
216
ISBN
978-1447328513
Product Format
Kindle
Dimensions
138 x 216
Publication Date
17 Nov 2016
Number of Pages
216
ISBN
978-1447328520

About the book

The shock Brexit result highlighted a worrying trend: underemployed white men and women who have seen their standard of living fall, their communities disintegrate and their sense of value, function and inclusion diminish, desperately want a mainstream political party to defend their interests. However, no such party exists. These men and women cannot connect their declining fortunes and growing frustrations to their true cause. Instead, immigrants are scapegoated and groups like the English Defence League (EDL) emerge.

This book is the first to offer an accessible and uncompromising look at the EDL. It aims to alter thinking about working-class politics and the rise of right-wing nationalism in the de-industrialised and decaying towns and cities of England. The rise of the right among the working class, the authors claim, is inextricably connected to the withdrawal of the political left from traditional working-class communities, and the left’s refusal to advance the economic interests of those who have suffered most from neoliberal economic restructuring. Incisive, contentious and boundary-breaking, it uses the voices of men and women who now support far-right political groups to address the total failure of mainstream parliamentary politics and the rising tide of frustration, resentment and anger.

Content

Introduction;
Dead Politics;
The Fickle Parent;
Redundant;
The Hated Centre;
The Scapegoat;
Mourning and Melancholia in the EDL;
Conclusion: Begin from the Beginning;
Postscript - Brexit.
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