Islam and social work

Culturally sensitive practice in a diverse world

By Sara Ashencaen Crabtree, Fatima Husain and Basia Spalek

Islam and social work
  • Published:

    07 Dec 2016
  • Edition:

    2nd Edition
  • Page count:

    224 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447330103
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • Series:

    BASW/Policy Press Titles
  • £23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    07 Dec 2016
  • Edition:

    2nd Edition
  • Page count:

    224 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447330097
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • Series:

    BASW/Policy Press Titles
  • £70.00 £56.00You save £14.00 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    07 Dec 2016
  • Edition:

    2nd Edition
  • Page count:

    224 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447330110
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • Series:

    BASW/Policy Press Titles
  • £23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%)
  • Add to basket

This unique textbook enables social work practitioners to gain a deeper understanding of how Islamic principles inform and influence the lives of Muslim populations.

Designed to support work with families and faith communities, this completely revised and updated edition examines religious precepts, cosmologies, philosophies and daily practices, while acknowledging cultural variants and population heterogeneity. It includes a comprehensive update of the research literature, international case studies, and new sections on religious extremism and ageing and end-of-life.

This is the only book specifically on social work with Muslim communities and provides an essential toolkit for culturally sensitive social work practice.

Sara Ashencaen Crabtree is a senior lecturer in Health and Social Work at Bournemouth University. Her previous academic posts were in Southeast Asia and the Middle East.

Fatima Husain's background is in family-based research and she is currently a senior researcher at The Centre for Economic and Social Inclusion, London.

Basia Spalek is Professor in Conflict Transformation within the Department for Therapeutic Practice at the University of Derby.

Introduction

The Muslim Ummah: context and concepts

Social Work Education & Islam principles

Gender Relations and the Morphology of the Family

Working with Families

Health and Muslim Families

Ageing & Muslim Communities

Muslim communities, crime, victimisation and criminal justice – with Tracey Devanna

Conclusion

"An interesting and informative read, for both the social worker and a broader range of practitioners." Professional Social Work, February 2009 (Review of the first edition)

"A really valuable and up-to-date resource that addresses all fields of social work. It gets at the questions that practitioners actually ask." David Pitcher, Children’s Guardian, Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service

"This excellent teaching and learning aid provides students with an insightful understanding of the Islamic faith to take forward into social work practice." David J. Gaylard, Senior Lecturer in Social Work, University of Chichester

About the book

This unique textbook enables social work practitioners to gain a deeper understanding of how Islamic principles inform and influence the lives of Muslim populations.

Designed to support work with families and faith communities, this completely revised and updated edition examines religious precepts, cosmologies, philosophies and daily practices, while acknowledging cultural variants and population heterogeneity. It includes a comprehensive update of the research literature, international case studies, and new sections on religious extremism and ageing and end-of-life.

This is the only book specifically on social work with Muslim communities and provides an essential toolkit for culturally sensitive social work practice.

Content

Introduction

The Muslim Ummah: context and concepts

Social Work Education & Islam principles

Gender Relations and the Morphology of the Family

Working with Families

Health and Muslim Families

Ageing & Muslim Communities

Muslim communities, crime, victimisation and criminal justice – with Tracey Devanna

Conclusion

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