Kids online

Opportunities and risks for children

Edited by Sonia Livingstone and Leslie Haddon

Kids online
  • Published:

    30 Sep 2009
  • Page count:

    296 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1847424389
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £21.99 £17.59You save £4.40 (20%)
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  • Published:

    30 Sep 2009
  • Page count:

    296 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1847424396
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £72.99 £58.39You save £14.60 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    30 Sep 2009
  • ISBN:

    978-1447315322
  • Product Dimensions:

    x mm
  • £19.99 £15.99You save £4.00 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    30 Sep 2009
  • ISBN:

    978-1447315339
  • Product Dimensions:

    x mm
  • £19.99 £15.99You save £4.00 (20%)
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As the internet and new online technologies are becoming embedded in everyday life, there are increasing questions about their social implications and consequences. Children, young people and their families tend to be at the forefront of new media adoption but they also encounter a range of risky or negative experiences for which they may be unprepared, which are subject to continual change.
This book captures the diverse, topical and timely expertise generated by the EU Kids Online project, which brings together 70 researchers in 21 countries across Europe. Each chapter has a distinct pan-European focus resulting in a uniquely comparative approach.
Sonia Livingstone is Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). She is author or editor of 14 books and many articles on media audiences, children and the internet, the domestic contexts of media use and media literacy. She directs the EU Kids Online network.
Leslie Haddon is Senior Researcher in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE, involved in coordinating the EU Kids Online network. Over the last 20 years he has conducted research and published numerous articles on the social shaping and consumption of information and communication technology, including authoring and editing five books.
Introduction ~ Sonia Livingstone and Leslie Haddon;
Section 1: Researching European children online: What we know, what we do not know ~ Verónica Donoso, Kjartan Ólafsson and Thorbjörn Broddason; Research with children ~ Bojana Lobe, José Alberto Simões and Bieke Zaman; Opportunities and pitfalls of cross-national research ~ Uwe Hasebrink, Kjartan Ólafsson and Václav Št?tka; Cultures of research and policy in Europe ~ Leslie Haddon and Gitte Stald
Section II: Going online: new opportunities?: Opportunities and benefits online ~ Pille Runnel, Veronika Kalmus, Pille Runnel and Andra Siibak; Adolescents and social network sites: identity, friendships and privacy ~ Jochen Peter, Patti M. Valkenburg and Cédric Fluckiger; Young people online: gender and age influences ~ Helen McQuillan and Leen d'Haenens; Digital divides ~ Panayiota Tsatsou, Pille Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt and Maria Francesca Murru
Section III: Going online: new risks?: Risky contacts ~ Marika Hanne Lüders, Petter Bae Brandtzæg and Elza Dunkels; Inappropriate content ~ Thomas Wold, Elena Aristodemou, Elza Dunkels and Yiannis Laouris; Problematic conduct: juvenile delinquency on the internet ~ Elisabeth Staksrud; Children and the internet in the news: agency, voices and agendas ~ Cristina Ponte, Joke Bauwens and Giovanna Mascheroni; The role of parental mediation in explaining cross-national experiences risk ~ Bojana Lobe, Katia Segers and Liza Tsaliki
Section IV: Policy implications: Maximising opportunities and minimising risks for children online ~ Jos de Haan; Parental mediation ~ Lucyna Kirwil, Maialen Garmendia, Carmelo Garitaonandia and Gemma Martínez Fernández; Making use of ICT for learning in European schools ~ Ingrid Paus-Hasebrink, Andrea Dürager, Christine Wijnen and Kadri Ugur; Media literacy ~ Brian O'Neill and Ingunn Hagen; Conclusion ~ Sonia Livingstone and Leslie Haddon

"..readers eager for a unique comparative assessment of issues around new digital literacies as they pertain to kids will find much in these pages. Recommended." H Lowood in Choice

"Professor Livingstone and colleagues provide extensive evidence-based findings which enable academics, educationalists, policy makers, parents and young people to think beyond anxieties generated by new technologies and make informed decisions about maximising digital opportunities while managing risks. An impressive and essential book, central to the child digital safety debate." Professor Tanya Byron, consultant clinical psychologist and author of the Byron Review, "Safer Children in a Digital World".

"Amid a public debate that has been highly polarised and often sensationalised, this book provides a balanced, theoretically sound and highly readable assessment of the research on young people’s engagement with new media. It will be an extremely valuable resource for academic researchers, policy makers, industry leaders and parents." Professor Kathryn C. Montgomery, School of Communication, American
University, and author of "Generation Digital: Politics, Commerce, and Childhood in the Age of the Internet" (MIT Press, 2007).

About the book

As the internet and new online technologies are becoming embedded in everyday life, there are increasing questions about their social implications and consequences. Children, young people and their families tend to be at the forefront of new media adoption but they also encounter a range of risky or negative experiences for which they may be unprepared, which are subject to continual change.
This book captures the diverse, topical and timely expertise generated by the EU Kids Online project, which brings together 70 researchers in 21 countries across Europe. Each chapter has a distinct pan-European focus resulting in a uniquely comparative approach.

Content

Introduction ~ Sonia Livingstone and Leslie Haddon;
Section 1: Researching European children online: What we know, what we do not know ~ Verónica Donoso, Kjartan Ólafsson and Thorbjörn Broddason; Research with children ~ Bojana Lobe, José Alberto Simões and Bieke Zaman; Opportunities and pitfalls of cross-national research ~ Uwe Hasebrink, Kjartan Ólafsson and Václav Št?tka; Cultures of research and policy in Europe ~ Leslie Haddon and Gitte Stald
Section II: Going online: new opportunities?: Opportunities and benefits online ~ Pille Runnel, Veronika Kalmus, Pille Runnel and Andra Siibak; Adolescents and social network sites: identity, friendships and privacy ~ Jochen Peter, Patti M. Valkenburg and Cédric Fluckiger; Young people online: gender and age influences ~ Helen McQuillan and Leen d'Haenens; Digital divides ~ Panayiota Tsatsou, Pille Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt and Maria Francesca Murru
Section III: Going online: new risks?: Risky contacts ~ Marika Hanne Lüders, Petter Bae Brandtzæg and Elza Dunkels; Inappropriate content ~ Thomas Wold, Elena Aristodemou, Elza Dunkels and Yiannis Laouris; Problematic conduct: juvenile delinquency on the internet ~ Elisabeth Staksrud; Children and the internet in the news: agency, voices and agendas ~ Cristina Ponte, Joke Bauwens and Giovanna Mascheroni; The role of parental mediation in explaining cross-national experiences risk ~ Bojana Lobe, Katia Segers and Liza Tsaliki
Section IV: Policy implications: Maximising opportunities and minimising risks for children online ~ Jos de Haan; Parental mediation ~ Lucyna Kirwil, Maialen Garmendia, Carmelo Garitaonandia and Gemma Martínez Fernández; Making use of ICT for learning in European schools ~ Ingrid Paus-Hasebrink, Andrea Dürager, Christine Wijnen and Kadri Ugur; Media literacy ~ Brian O'Neill and Ingunn Hagen; Conclusion ~ Sonia Livingstone and Leslie Haddon
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