General Non-Fiction

We publish serious non-fiction social commentary and debate for a wide audience. These high quality books are written by academics, professionals and other experts in an accessible way bringing key issues of social, political and cultural significant to a wide readership. These books have an impact: advancing knowledge, raising awareness and encouraging social change.

 

Showing 1-24 of 89 items.

The Economics of Arrival

Ideas for a grown-up economy

The richest countries already have plenty of wealth and resources – they have ‘arrived’. But they could make it impossible for people elsewhere to escape poverty. Trebeck and Williams describe a move from expansion to inclusion. Using global examples, they argue for an economy that delivers quality rather than quantity: an economy for everyone.

What’s wrong with work?

What’s wrong with work shows that how workers are treated has wide implications beyond the lives of workers themselves.

Recognising gender, race, class and global differences, the book considers the ways formal work is often dependent on informal work and concludes by considering what might make work better.

The lies we were told

Five years of austerity and brexit politics as it happened

Simon Wren-Lewis' widely-read Mainly Macro blog is an influential resource for policymakers, academics and social commentators. This book tells how damaging political and economic events of recent years became inevitable and serves as a warning to avert future disasters on this scale.

The class ceiling

Why it pays to be privileged

Snobbery

Snobbery matters because it is the way in which social divisions are built. In these times of growing social inequality, snobbery is becoming ever more pertinent. This book draws on literature, popular culture and autobiography as well as sociology and history to take a fresh and engaging look at this key social and cultural issue.

Who are universities for?

Re-making higher education

Who are universities for? argues for a large-scale shake up of how we organise higher education. It includes radical proposals for reform of the curriculum and how we admit students to higher education. Offering concrete solutions, it provides a way forward for universities to become more responsive to challenges.

Official Secrets

Child sex abuse from Cleveland to Savile

Official Secrets reveals that the enquiry that followed the Cleveland child abuse scandal of 1987 was a cover-up. Doctors were discouraged and social workers disempowered - a legacy that leads all the way to the current Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse.

Peak Inequality

Britain's ticking time bomb

Dorling brings together new material alongside a selection of his most recent writing on inequality from publications including the Daily Telegraph, the Guardian, New Statesman, Financial Times and the China People’s Daily. He explores whether we have now reached ‘peak inequality’ and concludes by predicting what the future holds for Britain.

The Right Amount of Panic

How women trade freedom for safety

With real-life accounts of women’s experiences, and based on the author’s original research, this book challenges the culture of victim-blaming and shows how much energy women put into avoiding sexual violence in public spaces.

The soul of a university

Why excellence is not enough

How can we re-establish universities’ social purpose? The solution lies with asking not only ‘what are we good at?’, but also ‘what are we good for?’. Chris Brink shows how universities can – and should - promote positive social change.

Law and society in a populist age

Balancing individual rights and the common good

Amitai Etzioni argues for a new liberal communitarian approach as an effective response to populism. The book considers national security versus privacy, private sector responsibility, freedom of the press, campaign finance reform, regulatory law and the legal status of terrorists, offering a timely discussion of key issues.

Life in the debt trap

Stories of children and families struggling with debt

The first hand stories in this book, collected through The Children's Society's campaign The Debt Trap, offer a unique understanding of life for families and children fighting a daily battle against poverty and debt.

Squaring the circle on Brexit

Could the Norway model work?

Two preeminent Norwegian scholars of politics and law offer a comprehensive first-hand account of Norway’s relationship with the EU and how this affects the country’s legal and political system, setting out what Britain can learn from Norway’s experience and how transferable these lessons are.

The new working class

How to win hearts, minds and votes

Who is working class today and how do political parties gain their support? This insightful book proposes what needs to be done to address the issues of the 'new working class'. It provides practical recommendations for political parties to reconnect with the electorate and regain trust.

White privilege

The myth of a post-racial society

Why and how do those from black and minority ethnic communities continue to be marginalised? Bhopal explores how neoliberal policy-making has increased discrimination faced by those from non-white backgrounds. This important book examines the impact of race on wider issues of inequality and difference in society.

Kill it to save it

An autopsy of capitalism’s triumph over democracy

Kill it to save it lays bare the hypocrisy of US political discourse by documenting the story of capitalism’s triumph over democracy. Dolgon argues that American citizens now accept policies that destroy the public sector and promote political stories that feel right “in the gut”, regardless of science or facts.

It’s Basic Income

The global debate

Contributors including Brian Eno, Demos Helsinki, California’s Y Combinator Research and prominent academics explore the impact Universal Basic Income could have on work, welfare and inequality in the 21st century.

How to build houses and save the countryside

Focusing on house building and conservation politics in England, Spiers uses his considerable experience and extensive research to demonstrate why the current model doesn’t work, and why there needs to be both planning reform and a more active role for the state, including local government.

Women, peace and welfare

A suppressed history of social reform, 1880-1920

Between 1880 and 1920 many women researched the conditions of social and economic life in Western countries, driven by a vision of a society based on welfare and altruism. Ann Oakley uses the women’s stories to bring together the histories of social reform, social science, welfare and pacifism.

Making sense of Brexit

Democracy, Europe and uncertain futures

What can we learn about our society and the need to listen to each other in order to make sense of Brexit within a wider world? This accessible book addresses the causes and implications of Brexit, exploring the anger against political elites as people felt estranged from a political process that no longer expressed their will.

The moral marketplace

How mission-driven millennials and social entrepreneurs are changing our world

Author and activist Asheem Singh explores how a movement of tiny ventures evolved into a global humanitarian and financial juggernaut, revealing new ways to fight privilege and inequality, rewire philanthropy, government and even capitalism itself.

Unravelling Europe’s ‘migration crisis’

Journeys over land and sea

This important new book provides a framework for understanding the dynamics underpinning recent unprecedented levels of migration across, and loss of life in, the Mediterranean, casting new light on the ‘migration crisis’ and challenging politicians, policy makers and the media to rethink their understanding of why and how people move.

Countering Extremism in British Schools?

The Truth about the Birmingham Trojan Horse Affair

In 2014 the ‘Trojan Horse’ affair, an alleged plot to ‘Islamify’ several state schools in Birmingham, caused a previously highly successful school to be vilified. Holmwood and O’Toole challenge the accepted narrative and show how it was used to justify an intrusive counter extremism agenda.

Broken benefits

What's gone wrong with welfare reform

In Broken Benefits, Sam Royston argues that social security isn’t working, and without a change in direction, it will be even less fair in the future.

He provides an introductory guide to social security, correcting misunderstandings and presents practical ideas of how benefits should be reformed.