Transparency and the open society

Practical lessons for effective policy

By Roger Taylor and Tim Kelsey

Transparency and the open society
  • Published:

    20 Jun 2016
  • Page count:

    376 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447325369
  • Product Dimensions:

    138 x 216 mm
  • £23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    20 Jun 2016
  • Page count:

    376 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447325383
  • Product Dimensions:

    138 x 216 mm
  • £23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    20 Jun 2016
  • Page count:

    376 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447325390
  • Product Dimensions:

    138 x 216 mm
  • £23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%)
  • Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Greater transparency is increasingly seen as the answer to a wide range of social issues by governments, NGOs and businesses around the world. However, evidence of its impact is mixed. Using case studies from around the world including India, Tanzania, the UK and US, Transparency and the open society surveys the adoption of transparency globally, providing an essential framework for assessing its likely performance as a policy and the steps that can be taken to make it more effective. It addresses the role of transparency in the context of growing use by governments and businesses of surveillance and database driven decision making. The book is written for anyone involved in the use of transparency whether campaigning from outside or working inside government or business to develop policies.
Roger Taylor is an entrepreneur and writer. He is founder and chair of the Open Public Services Network at the Royal Society of Arts. He co-founded Dr Foster, the healthcare information business that has pioneered transparency in healthcare.
Tim Kelsey was co-founder of Dr Foster. He was subsequently appointed the UK government's first director of transparency and open data and after that became the national director for the National Health Service in England responsible for information and digital services, as well as patient and public participation. He is visiting professor at the Institute for Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London. He is based in Melbourne, Australia where he is a director of Telstra Health
Introduction;
Section A: Theory;
Part 1: Background;
History And Methods;
Critiques Of Transparency;
Part 2: Definitions And Models;
Definitions Of Transparency;
Fair Allocation Systems;
Population Level Transparency;
Equality Of Narrative Power;
Transparency In An Age Of Big Data;
Section B: Practice;
Part 1: Transparency 1.0;
Every Day Is A Fight For Information;
Access To Information Laws (Ati);
Social Audit And Public Reporting;
International Initiatives;
Open Data And Forced Disclosure;
Editorial Control;
Regulation And Transparency;
Part 2: Transparency 2.0;
Ceding Control Of The Data;
Independent Narratives;
Getting My Own Data;
Surveillance, Transparency And Privacy;
Part 3: Transparency 3.0;
Artificial Intelligence And Allocation Systems;
What Happens Next?.

"An informative and challenging book...it clearly lays out information that is pertinent to existing debates in politics, ethics, law and the wider social sciences." LSE Review of Books

“Transparency matters, and it matters much more than people think. This important and serious book is both necessary and timely.” Tim Leunig, DfE Chief Scientific Adviser, and Associate Professor, LSE

"This is a book that more than lives up to the ideas in its title : it is not only transparent and open, but highly informative and thought-provoking." Professor Sir Julian Le Grand, LSE

About the book

Greater transparency is increasingly seen as the answer to a wide range of social issues by governments, NGOs and businesses around the world. However, evidence of its impact is mixed. Using case studies from around the world including India, Tanzania, the UK and US, Transparency and the open society surveys the adoption of transparency globally, providing an essential framework for assessing its likely performance as a policy and the steps that can be taken to make it more effective. It addresses the role of transparency in the context of growing use by governments and businesses of surveillance and database driven decision making. The book is written for anyone involved in the use of transparency whether campaigning from outside or working inside government or business to develop policies.

Content

Introduction;
Section A: Theory;
Part 1: Background;
History And Methods;
Critiques Of Transparency;
Part 2: Definitions And Models;
Definitions Of Transparency;
Fair Allocation Systems;
Population Level Transparency;
Equality Of Narrative Power;
Transparency In An Age Of Big Data;
Section B: Practice;
Part 1: Transparency 1.0;
Every Day Is A Fight For Information;
Access To Information Laws (Ati);
Social Audit And Public Reporting;
International Initiatives;
Open Data And Forced Disclosure;
Editorial Control;
Regulation And Transparency;
Part 2: Transparency 2.0;
Ceding Control Of The Data;
Independent Narratives;
Getting My Own Data;
Surveillance, Transparency And Privacy;
Part 3: Transparency 3.0;
Artificial Intelligence And Allocation Systems;
What Happens Next?.
Related Titles