What’s wrong with social security benefits?

By Paul Spicker

What’s wrong with social security benefits?
  • Published:

    22 Feb 2017
  • Page count:

    124 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447337324
  • Product Dimensions:

    129 x 198 mm
  • £9.99 £7.99You save £2.00 (20%)
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  • Published:

    22 Feb 2017
  • Page count:

    124 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447337355
  • Product Dimensions:

    129 x 198 mm
  • £7.99 £6.40You save £1.59 (20%)
  • Buy from Amazon.co.uk
  • Published:

    22 Feb 2017
  • Page count:

    124 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447337348
  • Product Dimensions:

    129 x 198 mm
  • £7.99 £6.40You save £1.59 (20%)
  • Add to basket
In this thought-provoking book, Paul Spicker challenges readers to rethink social security benefits in Britain. Putting a case for reform of the system, Spicker argues that most of the criticisms made of social security benefits – that spending is out of control, that it has led to mushrooming dependency, that it fails to get people into work, and that the system is riddled with fraud – are misconceived.
Addressing those misconceptions, Spicker assesses the real problems with the system, related to its size, its complexity, the expectation that benefits agencies should know everything, and the determination to ‘personalise’ benefits for millions of people. This stimulating short book is a valuable introduction to social security in Britain and the potential for its reform.
For more from the author on social security and social policy visit blog.spicker.uk.
Paul Spicker is Emeritus Professor of Public Policy at the Robert Gordon University and a Fellow of CROP, the International Social Science Council’s Comparative Research Programme on Poverty. His published work includes sixteen books, several shorter works and over 80 academic papers.
Understanding social security;
Misunderstanding social security;
The real problems;
How much is enough?;
Reforming key benefits;
Changing the benefits system.

"There are few people who know more about the benefits system than Paul Spicker, and it is a pleasure to have so much of his wisdom packaged in this short and cheap paperback." – Citizen's Income Trust

"This book provides an incisive description of the real problems of the current system, what social security is for and considers the possibilities of some alternative systems."
Gareth Morgan, Ferret Information Systems

“Social security may be complicated but Paul Spicker’s critical overview is clearly written, appropriately trenchant and thoughtfully provocative: a good read.” John Ditch, Honorary Professor, University of York

"At last some sense about social security. Spicker is a brave and independent voice. But with deep knowledge. Listen to him." Jonathan Bradshaw, University of York

Product Format
Paperback
Dimensions
129 x 198
Publication Date
22 Feb 2017
Number of Pages
124
ISBN
978-1447337324
Product Format
Kindle
Dimensions
129 x 198
Publication Date
22 Feb 2017
Number of Pages
124
ISBN
978-1447337355
Product Format
EPUB
Dimensions
129 x 198
Publication Date
22 Feb 2017
Number of Pages
124
ISBN
978-1447337348

About the book

In this thought-provoking book, Paul Spicker challenges readers to rethink social security benefits in Britain. Putting a case for reform of the system, Spicker argues that most of the criticisms made of social security benefits – that spending is out of control, that it has led to mushrooming dependency, that it fails to get people into work, and that the system is riddled with fraud – are misconceived.
Addressing those misconceptions, Spicker assesses the real problems with the system, related to its size, its complexity, the expectation that benefits agencies should know everything, and the determination to ‘personalise’ benefits for millions of people. This stimulating short book is a valuable introduction to social security in Britain and the potential for its reform.
For more from the author on social security and social policy visit blog.spicker.uk.

Content

Understanding social security;
Misunderstanding social security;
The real problems;
How much is enough?;
Reforming key benefits;
Changing the benefits system.
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