People and places

A 2001 Census atlas of the UK

By Danny Dorling and Bethan Thomas

People and places
  • Published:

    30 Jun 2004
  • Page count:

    224 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1861345554
  • Product Dimensions:

    240 x 303 mm
  • £35.99 £28.79You save £7.20 (20%)
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  • Published:

    04 Aug 2004
  • Page count:

    224 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1861345868
  • Product Dimensions:

    240 x 303 mm
  • £72.99 £58.39You save £14.60 (20%)
  • Add to basket
People and places: A 2001 Census atlas of the UK provides an at-a-glance guide to social change in the UK at the start of the new millennium. It is the first comprehensive analysis of the 2001 Census and offers unique comparisons with the findings of the previous Census a decade ago.
Over 500 full-colour maps covering 125 topics clearly illustrate the state of UK society today and how it is changing. The trends are explained and elaborated upon in the accompanying text. Using population maps in addition to conventional maps, the atlas covers all the major census topics at local authority level.
Key features include an illuminating graphic summary of over 100,000 key demographic statistics; new cartographic projections and techniques used throughout ; appendix incorporating rankings for 25 selected topics by local authority; comparison with the 1991 census to identify national and local trends and up-to-date analysis and discussion of the implications of current trends for future policy.
This authoritative atlas is essential reading for those interested in the current social geography of the UK, how it has changed and how it appears to be changing, including for planners in local authorities, health authorities and a wide range of statutory and voluntary organisations. It is also an invaluable resource for policy makers, journalists, politicians, students and academics interested in human geography and social change.
Daniel Dorling is Professor of Human Geography at the Department of Geography, University of Sheffield. He has published several atlases and books on the population of Britain, including The new social atlas of Britain on the 1991 Census. This is the first comprehensive work he has carried out on the 2001 Census.
Bethan Thomas is a Researcher at the Department of Geography, University of Sheffield. She recently completed her PhD at the University of Leeds. She is currently working on projecting population characteristics into the future and on the analysis of 15 million historical records of mortality data, official government surveys and flow data from various censuses.
Contents: Introduction and overview; Age and sex; Religion and ethnicity; Birthplace and migration; Qualifications and employment; Occupation and industry; Families and households; Homes and cars; Conclusion.

"... a compendium of facts that will have anyone interested in policy flipping through, manically, as well as wagging their fingers at their friends demanding 'did you know...?' From the precipitate rise of single living in London, Nottingham and Glasgow to the nation's unshakeable addiction to commuting by car - it is all here." Audacity

"... as handy a reference as they come." Regeneration & Renewal

"... extremely readable and engaging ... People and places is an interesting and visually impressive publication." Environment and Planning A

About the book

People and places: A 2001 Census atlas of the UK provides an at-a-glance guide to social change in the UK at the start of the new millennium. It is the first comprehensive analysis of the 2001 Census and offers unique comparisons with the findings of the previous Census a decade ago.
Over 500 full-colour maps covering 125 topics clearly illustrate the state of UK society today and how it is changing. The trends are explained and elaborated upon in the accompanying text. Using population maps in addition to conventional maps, the atlas covers all the major census topics at local authority level.
Key features include an illuminating graphic summary of over 100,000 key demographic statistics; new cartographic projections and techniques used throughout ; appendix incorporating rankings for 25 selected topics by local authority; comparison with the 1991 census to identify national and local trends and up-to-date analysis and discussion of the implications of current trends for future policy.
This authoritative atlas is essential reading for those interested in the current social geography of the UK, how it has changed and how it appears to be changing, including for planners in local authorities, health authorities and a wide range of statutory and voluntary organisations. It is also an invaluable resource for policy makers, journalists, politicians, students and academics interested in human geography and social change.

Content

Contents: Introduction and overview; Age and sex; Religion and ethnicity; Birthplace and migration; Qualifications and employment; Occupation and industry; Families and households; Homes and cars; Conclusion.
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