Poverty propaganda

Exploring the myths

By Tracy Shildrick

Poverty propaganda
  • Published:

    11 Apr 2018
  • Page count:

    208 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447323983
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%)
  • Pre-order
  • Published:

    11 Apr 2018
  • Page count:

    208 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447323976
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £70.00 £56.00You save £14.00 (20%)
  • Pre-order
  • Published:

    11 Apr 2018
  • Page count:

    208 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447324010
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%)
  • Coming soon
  • Published:

    11 Apr 2018
  • Page count:

    208 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447324027
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%)
Does ‘real’ poverty still exist in Britain? How do people differentiate between the supposed ‘deserving’ and ‘undeserving’ poor? Is there a culture of worklessness passed down generation to generation? Bringing together historical and contemporary material, Poverty Propaganda: Exploring the myths sheds new light on how poverty is understood in contemporary Britain.

The book debunks many popular myths and misconceptions about poverty and its prevalence, causes and consequences. In particular, it highlights the role of ‘poverty propaganda’ in sustaining class divides in perpetuating poverty and disadvantage in contemporary Britain.
Dr Tracy Shildrick is Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Newcastle. She is co-author of Poverty and insecurity (Policy Press, 2012) which won the Peter Townsend 2013 prize. Her research interests span youth transitions, worklessness, poverty and social exclusion.
Introduction;
Poverty propaganda;
Lived realities;
Labour markets and ‘poor work’;
Class and social immobility;
Discrimination, stigma and shame;
Poverty propaganda and the (re) production of poverty and privilege;
Conclusions.

"An essential guide to poverty in 21st Century Britain. Poverty Propaganda examines how the truth about poverty, its causes and consequences, continue to be hidden behind headlines, stories and images of the feckless undeserving poor." Imogen Tyler, University of Lancaster

About the book

Does ‘real’ poverty still exist in Britain? How do people differentiate between the supposed ‘deserving’ and ‘undeserving’ poor? Is there a culture of worklessness passed down generation to generation? Bringing together historical and contemporary material, Poverty Propaganda: Exploring the myths sheds new light on how poverty is understood in contemporary Britain.

The book debunks many popular myths and misconceptions about poverty and its prevalence, causes and consequences. In particular, it highlights the role of ‘poverty propaganda’ in sustaining class divides in perpetuating poverty and disadvantage in contemporary Britain.

Content

Introduction;
Poverty propaganda;
Lived realities;
Labour markets and ‘poor work’;
Class and social immobility;
Discrimination, stigma and shame;
Poverty propaganda and the (re) production of poverty and privilege;
Conclusions.
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