Return migration in later life

International perspectives

Edited by John Percival

Return migration in later life
  • Published:

    24 Jul 2013
  • Page count:

    272 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447301226
  • Product Dimensions:

    156 x 234 mm
  • £77.99 £15.60You save £62.39 (80%)
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There is increasing evidence that migrants who return in later life to their country or region of origin have not always thought through the personal, practical, and social implications of their decisions. This timely book explores this neglected subject in an era of ageing and more mobile societies and contains ground-breaking studies of migration flows of older people in North America, Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe, South Asia, and Australia, to explain how and why people in later life return to their country of origin.

It brings together a fusion of social gerontology, anthropology, migration, and human geography perspectives that explore the complex, and sometimes conflicting, themes of family ties and their emotive strengths; comparative quality and cost of health and welfare provision in host and home countries; life course transitions and cultural affinity with homeland; and psychological adjustment, belonging and attachment to place. This important book fills a gap in the market by raising important health and wellbeing implications and will be of interest to government departments, agencies working with and for older people, policy developers, research bodies, students in the above disciplines, and the tourism industry.
John Percival is Research Associate at Bristol University, UK, and has a background in social work and social gerontology. He has extensive research experience in qualitative and ethnographic studies of older people’s health, housing and social care requirements and priorities. He has led work on social inclusion in connection with sight loss, the benefits and disadvantages of assistive technologies, and end-of-life care in domestic settings and care homes.
Introduction: charting the waters of return migration in later life ~ John Percival; Older immigrants leaving Sweden ~ Martin Klinthäll; Place and residence attachments in Canada's older population ~ K. Bruce Newbold; Ageing immigrants and the question of return: new answers to an old dilemma? ~ Claudio Bolzman; Caribbean return migration in later-life: family issues and transnational experiences as influential pre-retirement factors ~ Dennis Conway, Robert B Potter and Godfrey St. Bernard; ‘We belong to the land’: older British immigrants in Australia contemplating and realising return home ~ John Percival; Diasporic returns to the city: Anglo-Indian and Jewish visits to Calcutta in later life ~ Alison Blunt, Jayani Bonnerjee and Noah Hysler-Rubin; Returning to ‘roots’: Estonian-Australian child migrants visiting the homeland ~ Brad Ruting; Ageing in the ancestral homeland: ethno-biographical reflections on return migration in later life ~ Anastasia Christou; 'The past is a foreign country': vulnerability to mental illness among return migrants: Gerard Leavey and Joanne Eliacin; The blues of the ageing ‘retornados’: narratives on the return to Chile ~ Erik Olsson; Concluding reflections ~ John Percival.
Product Format
Hardback
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
24 Jul 2013
Number of Pages
272
ISBN
978-1447301226

About the book

There is increasing evidence that migrants who return in later life to their country or region of origin have not always thought through the personal, practical, and social implications of their decisions. This timely book explores this neglected subject in an era of ageing and more mobile societies and contains ground-breaking studies of migration flows of older people in North America, Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe, South Asia, and Australia, to explain how and why people in later life return to their country of origin.

It brings together a fusion of social gerontology, anthropology, migration, and human geography perspectives that explore the complex, and sometimes conflicting, themes of family ties and their emotive strengths; comparative quality and cost of health and welfare provision in host and home countries; life course transitions and cultural affinity with homeland; and psychological adjustment, belonging and attachment to place. This important book fills a gap in the market by raising important health and wellbeing implications and will be of interest to government departments, agencies working with and for older people, policy developers, research bodies, students in the above disciplines, and the tourism industry.

Content

Introduction: charting the waters of return migration in later life ~ John Percival; Older immigrants leaving Sweden ~ Martin Klinthäll; Place and residence attachments in Canada's older population ~ K. Bruce Newbold; Ageing immigrants and the question of return: new answers to an old dilemma? ~ Claudio Bolzman; Caribbean return migration in later-life: family issues and transnational experiences as influential pre-retirement factors ~ Dennis Conway, Robert B Potter and Godfrey St. Bernard; ‘We belong to the land’: older British immigrants in Australia contemplating and realising return home ~ John Percival; Diasporic returns to the city: Anglo-Indian and Jewish visits to Calcutta in later life ~ Alison Blunt, Jayani Bonnerjee and Noah Hysler-Rubin; Returning to ‘roots’: Estonian-Australian child migrants visiting the homeland ~ Brad Ruting; Ageing in the ancestral homeland: ethno-biographical reflections on return migration in later life ~ Anastasia Christou; 'The past is a foreign country': vulnerability to mental illness among return migrants: Gerard Leavey and Joanne Eliacin; The blues of the ageing ‘retornados’: narratives on the return to Chile ~ Erik Olsson; Concluding reflections ~ John Percival.
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