The public health system in England

By David J. Hunter, Linda Marks and Katherine Smith

The public health system in England
Health systems everywhere are experiencing rapid change in response to new threats to health, including from lifestyle diseases, risks of pandemic flu, and the global effects of climate change but health inequalities continue to widen. Such developments have profound implications for the future direction of public health policy and practice. 
The public health system in England offers a wide-ranging, provocative and accessible assessment of challenges confronting a public health system, exploring how its parameters have shifted and what the origins of dilemmas in public health practice are. The book will therefore appeal to public health professionals and students of health policy, potentially engaging them in political and social advocacy. 
David J. Hunter is Professor of Health Policy and Management at Durham University. He is Director of the Centre for Public Policy and Health, School of Medicine and Health and a Wolfson Fellow in the Wolfson Research Institute. He has extensive research experience in health systems and public health and has published widely on these subjects. His last book, The Health Debate, was published by The Policy Press in September 2008.
Linda Marks is Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Public Policy and Health, School of Medicine and Health, Durham University and a Wolfson Fellow in the Wolfson Research Institute. She has previously held posts at the King's Fund as Fellow in Health Policy Analysis and in the NHS as a Non Executive Director of a Primary Care Trust. Research interests include health policy, health inequalities and public health governance.
Katherine E. Smith is a Research Fellow in Applied Policy Research in the School for Health at the University of Bath. She was previously a Research Fellow in the Centre for Public Policy and Health at Durham University. Her research interests include: the relationship between public health research and policy, corporate policy influence in Europe (and its public health consequences), and health inequalities in the UK. 
Introduction; Public health and a public health system; The evolution of the public health function in England (1) 1974-97; The evolution of the public health function in England (2) 1997-2009; Current issues in the public health system in England; Looking to the future.

"...I have found this to be an enjoyable, informative and thought provoking read that I recommend to anyone for an introduction to the English public health system and how it has developed since 1974." David Edwards in Public Health Today

"An important new review of an old and intractable problem: our health system is incapable of keeping people healthy. This trenchant analysis must help to kick-start a radical shift in policy and practice." Anna Coote, New Economics Foundation

Product Format
Paperback
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
10 Mar 2010
Number of Pages
200
ISBN
978-1847424624
Product Format
Hardback
Dimensions
156 x 234
Publication Date
10 Mar 2010
Number of Pages
200
ISBN
978-1847424631

About the book

Health systems everywhere are experiencing rapid change in response to new threats to health, including from lifestyle diseases, risks of pandemic flu, and the global effects of climate change but health inequalities continue to widen. Such developments have profound implications for the future direction of public health policy and practice. 
The public health system in England offers a wide-ranging, provocative and accessible assessment of challenges confronting a public health system, exploring how its parameters have shifted and what the origins of dilemmas in public health practice are. The book will therefore appeal to public health professionals and students of health policy, potentially engaging them in political and social advocacy. 

Content

Introduction; Public health and a public health system; The evolution of the public health function in England (1) 1974-97; The evolution of the public health function in England (2) 1997-2009; Current issues in the public health system in England; Looking to the future.
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