Understanding crime and social policy

By Emma Wincup

Understanding crime and social policy

Understanding crime and social policy explores the interface between crime and social policy, drawing upon international theoretical developments and empirical research from within Criminology and Social Policy. Written by an experienced author, it uses analysis of policy-making under the New Labour and Conservative-Liberal Democrat governments to reflect upon the multiplicity of influences which shape the formulation and delivery of crime control policies, the changing nature of government and governance in neo-liberal societies, and the enhanced role of the welfare state in 'solving' crime 'problems'. A unique feature of the book is the inclusion of policy examples including the resettlement of prisoners, problem drug use and 'troubled' families.

Understanding crime and social policy encourages readers to reflect upon the close connections, and sometimes tensions, between crime reduction and social policy agendas and is aimed at two audiences. The first is students on courses in criminology, criminal justice and social policy. The second is practitioners from across the public, private and voluntary sector.

Emma Wincup is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Leeds, where she is Director of Student Education in the School of Law and Deputy Director of the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies. Emma's current research explores the interconnections between crime policy, particularly in relation to problem drug use, and welfare reform. She has also published extensively on the criminological research process.

Introducing crime and Social Policy;

Crime and criminalisation;

Influences on crime policy;

Delivering crime policy;

The resettlement of prisoners;

When policy arenas collide: tackling problem drug use;

Case study 1: Troubled’ or ‘Troublesome’ Families? Social Policy and Crime Prevention;

Case study 2: anti-social behaviour;

Case study 3: drug ‘misuse’;

Concluding comments.

?"Provides a useful overview of the complex and often messy business of policy making through the use of some very contemporary and relevant examples of areas of crime and social policy concern." Journal of Social Policy

"[Provides a] rigorous challenging of dominant assumptions while leading readers through a very complex policy-making landscape." People, Place and Policy

"An engaging, wide-ranging and up-to-date introductory text for students and practitioners who wish to get to grips with the interconnections between criminology as the study of crime and social policy as the study of human well-being." Dr Ros Burnett, Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford.

"This is a welcome exploration of the linkages and relationships between criminal justice and social policy. Combining critical scholarship with a practical assessment of current policy, it will be of interest both to academics and practitioners." Richard Garside, Director, Centre for Crime and Justice Studies

"A well-researched text written by a respected author." Nigel Rourke, University of Cumbria.

About the book

Understanding crime and social policy explores the interface between crime and social policy, drawing upon international theoretical developments and empirical research from within Criminology and Social Policy. Written by an experienced author, it uses analysis of policy-making under the New Labour and Conservative-Liberal Democrat governments to reflect upon the multiplicity of influences which shape the formulation and delivery of crime control policies, the changing nature of government and governance in neo-liberal societies, and the enhanced role of the welfare state in 'solving' crime 'problems'. A unique feature of the book is the inclusion of policy examples including the resettlement of prisoners, problem drug use and 'troubled' families.

Understanding crime and social policy encourages readers to reflect upon the close connections, and sometimes tensions, between crime reduction and social policy agendas and is aimed at two audiences. The first is students on courses in criminology, criminal justice and social policy. The second is practitioners from across the public, private and voluntary sector.

Content

Introducing crime and Social Policy;

Crime and criminalisation;

Influences on crime policy;

Delivering crime policy;

The resettlement of prisoners;

When policy arenas collide: tackling problem drug use;

Case study 1: Troubled’ or ‘Troublesome’ Families? Social Policy and Crime Prevention;

Case study 2: anti-social behaviour;

Case study 3: drug ‘misuse’;

Concluding comments.

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