Showing 1-19 of 19 items.
Advising in Austerity

Advising in Austerity

27 Apr 2017
Research led by Prof Morag McDermont of University of Bristol Law School has explored the ways in which advice organisations such as Citizens Advice (CA) have become key actors in legal arenas, particularly for citizens who face the most disadvantage in upholding their rights. Read more on our blog
Academic Work, Fast and Slow

Academic Work, Fast and Slow

26 Apr 2017
Should academics strive to be ‘fast’ or ‘slow’? Helen Kara, author of Research and evaluation for busy students and practitioners, argues that there is not one, clear answer. Read more on our blog
Where is the harm in work?

Where is the harm in work?

20 Apr 2017
How do we recognise work-based exploitation and harm? Sam Scott, author of Labour exploitation and work-based harm, argues that the ‘harm in work’ might not always be as obvious as we think and that more needs to be done to protect employees from exploitation in the workplace. Read more on our blog
Family migration: Re-uniting across international borders

Family migration: Re-uniting across international borders

19 Apr 2017
Why have so many Polish families chosen to make the UK their home? In this blog post, Anne White discusses some of the motivations for and complexities of family migration to the UK, as explored in her book, Polish families and migration since EU accession, out today in paperback. Read more on our blog
Tax reform and a Corbyn-led government will save our local services

Tax reform and a Corbyn-led government will save our local services

13 Apr 2017
Peter Latham, author of Who stole the town hall?, argues that the Spring Budget highlighted the Conservative Party’s allegiance to the City of London, not the small businesses, entrepreneurs and self-employed they profess to support. Read more on our blog
Human-centred governance: transforming government from the outside-in

Human-centred governance: transforming government from the outside-in

12 Apr 2017
Design approaches are now being applied all over the world as a powerful approach to innovating public policies and services. Christian Bason, author of Leading public design: Discovering human-centred governance, argues that by bringing design methods into play, public managers can lead change with citizens at the centre, and discover a new model for steering public organisations: human-centred governance. Read more on our blog
Attitudes to social security in Britain today

Attitudes to social security in Britain today

10 Apr 2017
As new welfare reforms come into effect this month the editors of a special issue of the Journal of Poverty and Social Justice explore attitudes to and experiences of welfare. Read more on our blog
Care and caring: challenge, crisis or opportunity?

Care and caring: challenge, crisis or opportunity?

7 Apr 2017
As the first issue of the International Journal of Care and Caring publishes, Sue Yeandle, Editor-in-Chief, highlights the global space that care now occupies and introduces the journal as a new forum where world-class knowledge about care, caring and carers can be shared. Read more on our blog
#EUfightback: staying hopeful and determined for a continent united in diversity

#EUfightback: staying hopeful and determined for a continent united in diversity

6 Apr 2017
In the wake of the triggering of Article 50, Dimitris Ballas, Danny Dorling and Benjamin Hennig, co-authors of The human atlas of Europe, find hope in the diversity that unites the European Union. Read more on our blog
Article 50: where we are now

Article 50: where we are now

4 Apr 2017
Janice Morphet, author of Beyond Brexit, looks at what the future holds for the U.K. after the triggering of Aritcle 50 and the formal beginning of the Brexit process. Read more on our blog
The truth about benefits sanctions

The truth about benefits sanctions

30 Mar 2017
300,000 people have had their benefits suddenly stopped by sanctions in the last 12 months, many of whom have been plunged into poverty, unable to heat their homes or even eat.On today’s National Day of Action Against Sanctions, Ruth Patrick highlights the reality of welfare reform as laid out in her new book, For whose benefit? Read more on our blog
The ‘troubled’ case of Rotherham

The ‘troubled’ case of Rotherham

21 Mar 2017
On this World Social Work Day, Jadwiga Leigh discusses the findings of her paper co-authored with Stephen Crossley on ‘The ‘troubled’ case of Rotherham’. This case had a huge impact on the creation of a culture of fear, mistrust and blame in social work. How did this happen and what can we learn? Read more on our blog
What would Beatrice Webb say now?

What would Beatrice Webb say now?

8 Mar 2017
On this International Women’s Day Georgia Smith, Communications Officer at Webb Memorial Trust, highlights the accomplishments of sociologist and social reformer Beatrice Webb, a woman who was truly bold for change. Read more on our blog
Are the Sister Marches reclaiming feminism? Reflections on International Women’s Day

Are the Sister Marches reclaiming feminism? Reflections on International Women’s Day

8 Mar 2017
Miriam E. David, author of Reclaiming feminism, looks at how Donald Trump’s election has contributed to the recent surge of global feminist protest and how International Woman’s Day provides an important focal point for change. Read more on our blog
It doesn’t have to be like this: Why capitalism needs to change, and fast

It doesn’t have to be like this: Why capitalism needs to change, and fast

3 Mar 2017
Where has capitalism gone wrong? In Too much stuff, Kozo Yamamura upends conventional capitalist wisdom to provide a new approach. Read about his new perspective on capitalism’s “sickness.” Read more on our blog
What does the post-Brexit future look like?

What does the post-Brexit future look like?

28 Feb 2017
Janice Morphet, author of Beyond Brexit, out today, warns that without due consideration of all the challenges that lie ahead, Brexit poses a real threat to UK economic and social stability. In this article Professor Morphet looks ahead to what the coming months could bring, and suggests priorities going forward. Read more on our blog
The welfare myth of them and us

The welfare myth of them and us

16 Feb 2017
Read the complete preface to the second edition of John Hill’s influential Good times, bad times below. This ground-breaking book uses extensive research and survey evidence to challenge the myth that the population divides into those who benefit from the welfare state and those who pay into it – ‘skivers’ and ‘strivers’, ‘them’ and ‘us’. Read more on our blog
Open access: A publisher’s perspective

Open access: A publisher’s perspective

16 Feb 2017
Julia Mortimer, Assistant Director of Policy Press/University of Bristol Press, explores the benefits, opportunities and challenges of open access (OA), one of the most significant publishing developments since the invention of the printing press. Read more on our blog
Use Kudos to maximise and measure the impact of your research

Use Kudos to maximise and measure the impact of your research

13 Feb 2017
Kudos helps you maximise and measure the impact of your research and allows authors to manage the promotion of all their publications across different forms of social media and email, and provides a range of article level metrics (including altmetrics, citations, and downloads) – all in a single place. Read more on our blog