Digital sociologies

Edited by Jessie Daniels, Karen Gregory and Tressie McMillan Cottom

Digital sociologies
  • Published:

    16 Nov 2016
  • Page count:

    528 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447329015
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • £29.99 £23.99You save £6.00 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    16 Nov 2016
  • Page count:

    528 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447329008
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • £80.00 £64.00You save £16.00 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    16 Nov 2016
  • Page count:

    528 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447329039
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • £29.99 £23.99You save £6.00 (20%)
  • Add to basket
  • Published:

    16 Nov 2016
  • Page count:

    528 pages
  • ISBN:

    978-1447329046
  • Product Dimensions:

    172 x 240 mm
  • £29.99 £23.99You save £6.00 (20%)
  • Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Providing a much needed overview of the growing field of digital sociology, this handbook connects digital media technologies to the traditional sociological areas of study, like labour, culture, education, race, class and gender. Rooted in a critical understanding of inequality as foundational to digital sociology and is edited by leaders in the field. It includes topics ranging from web analytics, wearable technologies, social media analysis and digital labour. This rigorous, accessible text explores contemporary dilemmas and problems of the digital age in relation to inequality, institutions and social identity, making it suitable for use for a global audience on a variety of social science courses and beyond. Offering an important step forward for the discipline of sociology Digital sociologies is an important intellectual benchmark in placing digital at the forefront of investigating the social.
Jessie Daniels is a professor, author and an internationally recognized expert on the Internet manifestations of racism. She is the author of two books about race and various forms of media, as well as dozens of peer-reviewed articles in journals such as New Media & Society, Gender & Society, American Journal of Public Health, and Women’s Studies Quarterly. She co-founded Racism Review, with Joe R. Feagin, and was awarded a Ford Foundation grant for JustPublics@365. In 2014, Contexts Magazine profiled her as “Pioneering Digital Sociology.

Karen Gregory is a lecturer in Digital Sociology at the University of Edinburgh. Her research focuses on contemporary spirituality, precarity, entrepreneurialism and digital media. Her writings have appeared in Women’s Studies Quarterly, Women and Performance, The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, and Visual Studies. Karen is the founder of CUNY Graduate Center’s Digital Labor Working Group, which was featured in The Atlantic.

Tressie McMillan Cottom is a former fellow at the Microsoft Social Media Collective, the Center for Poverty Research at UC-Davis and she serves on the American Sociological Association’s “Task Force on Engaging Sociology”. Her work has examined education expansion, media, technology and the intersections of race, class and gender. And her publications have appeared in Contexts, Western Journal of Emergency Medicine and Human Affairs as well as edited volumes. Tressie’s public sociology has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, The Atlantic and NPR. Her blog and social media accounts have numerous citations and awards.
Preface ~ Sassen;
Volume Introduction ~ Gregory, Cottom, Daniels;
PART I. DIGITAL SOCIOLOGY IN EVERDAY LIFE;
(SECTION INTRO) Structure and Agency in a Digital World ~ Karen Gregory;
Beyond Digital Dualism: Modeling Digital Community ~ Alexia Maddox;
A Return to Gemeinschaft: Digital Impression Management and the Sharing Economy ~ Alexandrea Ravenelle;
Digital Discourse Analysis: Finding Meaning In Small Online Spaces ~ Timothy Recuber;
Virtually Ethical: Ethnographic Challenges in Researching Textile Crafters Online ~ Alison Mayne;
Interactivity, Social Media, and Superman: How Comic Books Can Help Us Understand And Conceptualise Interactivity Online ~ Harry T. Dyer;
The Digital Solidarity Trap: Social Movement Research and Online Activism ~ Theresa A. Hunt;
Positively Digital Orientalism: Discursive Authority in Online Tourist Reviews ~ W. Trevor Jamerson;
PART II: DIGITIZED INSTITUTIONS;
(SECTION INTRO) Digitized Institutions and Inequalities ~ Tressie McMillan Cottom;
Toward a Digital Sociology of School ~ Neil Selwyn, Selena Nemorin, Scott Bulfin and Nicola Johnson;
Representing ‘Inforgs’ in Data-Driven Decisions ~ Jeffery Alan Johnson;
Employee Monitoring in a Digital Context ~ Calle Rosengren and Mikael Ottoson;
Digital Sociology’s Vocational Promise ~ Stephen Barnard;
Black CyberFeminism: Ways Forward for Intersectionality and Digital Sociology ~ Tressie McMillan Cottom;
Deconstructing Racism on College Websites ~ Monita H. Mungo;
Yakking About College Life ~ Francesca Tripodi;
On Thursdays We Watch Scandal: Communal Viewing and Black Twitter ~ Apryl Williams;
Disruptive Labor: Bleacher Report and the Monetization of Mass Amateurization ~ Andrew McKinney;
Covert Leisure and Public Space: Geocaching In Post-9/11 New York City ~ Jonathan R. Wynn;
PART III: DIGITAL BODIES;
(SECTION INTRO), Bodies in Code ~ Jessie Daniels;
Personal Data Practices in the Age of Lively Data ~ Deborah Lupton;
“They’re just too urban”: Black gamers streaming on Twitch ~ Kishonna Gray;
From “Geek” to “Chic”: Wearable Technology and the Woman Question ~ Elizabeth
Wissinger;
Queer Facebook? Digital Sociality and Queer Theory ~ Benjamin Haber;
The Ms. Dewey “Experience”: Technoculture, Gender, and Race ~ Miriam E. Sweeney;
The Emperor’s New Data Clothes: Implications of ‘Nudity’ as a Racialized and Gendered Metaphor in Discourse on Personal Digital Data ~ Yuliya Grinberg;
Post Your Comments Below: A Case Study of Immigrant Bashing Online ~ Adrian Cruz and Kazuyo Kubo;
Our Mothers Have Always Been Machines: The Conflation of Media and Motherhood ~ Kara Van Cleaf;
#notracist: Exploring Racism Denial Talk on Twitter ~ Sanjay Sharma and Phillip Brooker.

"A comprehensive account of the digital sociology project whose scope is startling in its ambition and which shows how the digital has implications for nearly all sociological topics, questions and problems." David Beer, University of York

"Highly recommended [for] graduate students and faculty." - CHOICE

"In this cutting-edge book innovative scholars with an impressive array of sociological perspectives probe major dimensions of our increasingly pervasive digital world..... A book for all concerned about the digital revolution and the future of global democracy.?" Joe Feagin, Texas A&M University and Past-President, American Sociological Association

“An exciting volume of essays addressing new digital sociologies....timely and engaging and confront more conventional sociologies with a new upstart in the field.” John Holmwood, University of Nottingham

"An in-depth conceptual analysis of everyday life – an invaluable and essential contribution - I highly recommend it." Emma Bond, University of Suffolk

About the book

Providing a much needed overview of the growing field of digital sociology, this handbook connects digital media technologies to the traditional sociological areas of study, like labour, culture, education, race, class and gender. Rooted in a critical understanding of inequality as foundational to digital sociology and is edited by leaders in the field. It includes topics ranging from web analytics, wearable technologies, social media analysis and digital labour. This rigorous, accessible text explores contemporary dilemmas and problems of the digital age in relation to inequality, institutions and social identity, making it suitable for use for a global audience on a variety of social science courses and beyond. Offering an important step forward for the discipline of sociology Digital sociologies is an important intellectual benchmark in placing digital at the forefront of investigating the social.

Content

Preface ~ Sassen;
Volume Introduction ~ Gregory, Cottom, Daniels;
PART I. DIGITAL SOCIOLOGY IN EVERDAY LIFE;
(SECTION INTRO) Structure and Agency in a Digital World ~ Karen Gregory;
Beyond Digital Dualism: Modeling Digital Community ~ Alexia Maddox;
A Return to Gemeinschaft: Digital Impression Management and the Sharing Economy ~ Alexandrea Ravenelle;
Digital Discourse Analysis: Finding Meaning In Small Online Spaces ~ Timothy Recuber;
Virtually Ethical: Ethnographic Challenges in Researching Textile Crafters Online ~ Alison Mayne;
Interactivity, Social Media, and Superman: How Comic Books Can Help Us Understand And Conceptualise Interactivity Online ~ Harry T. Dyer;
The Digital Solidarity Trap: Social Movement Research and Online Activism ~ Theresa A. Hunt;
Positively Digital Orientalism: Discursive Authority in Online Tourist Reviews ~ W. Trevor Jamerson;
PART II: DIGITIZED INSTITUTIONS;
(SECTION INTRO) Digitized Institutions and Inequalities ~ Tressie McMillan Cottom;
Toward a Digital Sociology of School ~ Neil Selwyn, Selena Nemorin, Scott Bulfin and Nicola Johnson;
Representing ‘Inforgs’ in Data-Driven Decisions ~ Jeffery Alan Johnson;
Employee Monitoring in a Digital Context ~ Calle Rosengren and Mikael Ottoson;
Digital Sociology’s Vocational Promise ~ Stephen Barnard;
Black CyberFeminism: Ways Forward for Intersectionality and Digital Sociology ~ Tressie McMillan Cottom;
Deconstructing Racism on College Websites ~ Monita H. Mungo;
Yakking About College Life ~ Francesca Tripodi;
On Thursdays We Watch Scandal: Communal Viewing and Black Twitter ~ Apryl Williams;
Disruptive Labor: Bleacher Report and the Monetization of Mass Amateurization ~ Andrew McKinney;
Covert Leisure and Public Space: Geocaching In Post-9/11 New York City ~ Jonathan R. Wynn;
PART III: DIGITAL BODIES;
(SECTION INTRO), Bodies in Code ~ Jessie Daniels;
Personal Data Practices in the Age of Lively Data ~ Deborah Lupton;
“They’re just too urban”: Black gamers streaming on Twitch ~ Kishonna Gray;
From “Geek” to “Chic”: Wearable Technology and the Woman Question ~ Elizabeth
Wissinger;
Queer Facebook? Digital Sociality and Queer Theory ~ Benjamin Haber;
The Ms. Dewey “Experience”: Technoculture, Gender, and Race ~ Miriam E. Sweeney;
The Emperor’s New Data Clothes: Implications of ‘Nudity’ as a Racialized and Gendered Metaphor in Discourse on Personal Digital Data ~ Yuliya Grinberg;
Post Your Comments Below: A Case Study of Immigrant Bashing Online ~ Adrian Cruz and Kazuyo Kubo;
Our Mothers Have Always Been Machines: The Conflation of Media and Motherhood ~ Kara Van Cleaf;
#notracist: Exploring Racism Denial Talk on Twitter ~ Sanjay Sharma and Phillip Brooker.
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